CURRICULUM

Maths Week 2016 - Workbook

Time workbook to support Maths week.

Reading Scheme Information

Additional information on the reading scheme

Phonics Information

Additional information on phonics

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Additional information regarding the curriculum can be obtained from the class teacher in each year group.

NURSERY SUMMER TERM 2019

 

 

Personal, Social and Emotional Development

We will revisit Nursery rules so that all children are aware of how their actions and actions of others affect everyone. As part of our refinement of resources, we will be encouraging collaboration.

We will be taking a trip to the theatre this term, encouraging children to take part in new social situations and meet unfamiliar people.

We will continue updating the children on Tapestry and invite you to add any photographs at any time. This enables each child to spend time with us celebrating their achievements.

Communication and Language

The children will be encouraged to show an interest in what others are saying, especially when on the carpet for large group and team time.

Our early phonics activities will encourage the children to tune into sounds, listen and remember sounds and talk about sounds.

We will look at our new ‘Looking Lantern’ in more detail to encourage and explore children’s interests.

Literacy

Through reading lots of stories the children will become aware of different characters in books. They will begin to understand that stories have a beginning, middle and end.

All mark making will be valued and encouraged. We will continue to support the children in learning how to write their names

Physical Development

The children have daily opportunities for outdoor play when they have space to run and play. The equipment allows them to climb and mount steps using alternate feet. They are able to judge distances, negotiate space and start and stop whether chasing each other or riding bikes. We have many new resources for children to explore to build their gross motor skills including milk crates, large sweeping brushes and mops.

The cut and stick table allows development of fine motor skills through use of scissors, the mark making table through pencil use and bead threading requires hand/eye coordination.

There will also be regaulr ‘Funky Fingers’ activities, where the children will have the opportunity to develop fine motor skills, which are important when learning how to write.

Starting Interest – Eggs, minibeasts, animals, growing
Stimulus – The environment – indoors and outdoors
Understanding the World

Moving into summer we will be excited to explore the changes that spring has brought us. All children will follow instructions to make ‘cress heads’, and after learning what is important for growth, they will be supported to make a decision of where a good place to grow their cress head. We will look at the story ‘Jack and the Beanstalk’ and plant our own beans during child-initiated time.

 

The children will also have some exciting visitors this half term, eggs will be in the incubator in nursery, but what will hatch? We will make predictions and encourage daily observations.

 

We will continue to explore the changes outdoors and follow the children’s interests in minibeasts to make a minibeast hotel.

Mathematics

We will continue to practise reciting numbers in order to 10 (and beyond when appropriate) and recognising numbers. The children will be asked to represent numbers using their fingers and be made aware that numbers can be made in different ways, eg 3+0=3 and 2+1=3. They will compare two groups of objects saying when they have the same number and when one has more/less than the other. We will look at estimating groups and checking to see if our sensible guesses are correct!

Our topic work will give opportunities to use language such as ‘big’ and ‘little’, ‘heavy’ and ‘light’ following the changes we are making in nursery

The children will become aware of the importance of knowing the time through snack time, tidy up time and home time. We will continue to follow our visual timetable.

Expressive Arts and Design

Powder paints are always available, the children can explore how the powder can be mixed and changed. We will encourage the children to use a variety of materials when making models and pictures.

The home corner inside is always popular and gives the children to engage in domestic play. Outdoors the children like have the scope to turn the wendy house into whatever they like – the vets, hairdressers, hospital, McDonalds – enabling them to recreate first hand experiences.

The musical instruments are always available to allow the children to experiment with sound.

RECEPTION SPRING TERM 2019 1

This term our topic will be Snow and Ice and we will link this to all seven areas of learning. We will use the book ‘Penguin Small’ by Mick Inkpen as our starting point.

In Communication and Language we will be sharing books relating to the weather and animals from different countries / climates and learning new poems and rhymes. The children will be encouraged to offer their own ideas about life in these countries using new vocabulary they have learnt.

In literacy we will be writing our own poems and rhymes. We will be writing postcards from different countries, completing weather charts and writing captions and descriptions for our paintings, drawings and collage. We will develop our comprehension skills by demonstrating an understanding of what we have read and anticipating key events. We will continue to work in our phonics groups and learn new letters and sounds, which will develop both reading and writing skills.

In Personal, Social and Emotional Development we will be learning to respect and care for living things as we make bird seed cake to help the woodland birds survive in the cold weather. We will build up our resilience and perseverance in the face of challenge. We will talk about New Year and resolutions to improve our choices and ways of helping each other.

In Physical Development we will learn how to negotiate space and obstacles safely and develop our ball skills. Mr Drane, our sports coach, will lead our PE sessions which will now be held on a Tuesday. Daily opportunities are provided so that the children can move energetically. Through our continued *funky fingers* activities we will develop our fine motor skills

In Mathematics we will learn how to subitise up to five and learn number bonds for numbers zero to five, including corresponding partitioniong facts. We will learn double facts up to five plus five and explore odd and even number.

In Understanding the World we will become weather and polar animal experts as we compile fact booklets by looking closely at non-fiction books for our research. We will develop our observational skills when we look at seasonal change, weather, animals and plants. We will learn about the similarities and differences between the natural world around us and contrasting environments.

In Expressive Art and Design we will use different media such as paint, textiles and pastels to create representattonal pictures of cold weather, places and animals and we will explore different shades of cold colours. We will share our creations and talk about the processes we have used. We will co-construct, invent, adapt and recount narratives and stories with each other and our teachers.

As you know, our Reception children are very creative and love to make wonderful models with *junk*. Please keep us stocked up with clean junk (e.g. small boxes, plastic containers and bottles, tubes, old envelopes, wrapping paper, ribbon, bottle tops etc.) Please keep your Christmas cards as the children will enjoy using them in the writing area.

Download Reception Curriculum

YEAR 1 2018/19

Subject Autumn 1 Autumn 2 Spring 1 Spring 2 Summer 1 Summer 2
Core text/Theme Enchanted Kingdom Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Jungle Adventure The Lonely Beast Earth and Beyond

 

Man on the Moon
 

English

 

 

Fairytale Stories– Jack and the Beanstalk Carousel

Stories with patterned language– Jack and the Bean Stalk Carousel

Instructions – How to grow a bean stalk

Poetry, rhyme and pattern – The Gingerbread Man, The Three Little Pigs

 

Supporting texts

Jack and the Beanstalk

The Gingerbread Man

The Three Little Pigs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fairytale Stories- Snow White carousel

Recounts- Snow white/ witch/ dwarfs point of view

Poetry: Using the senses – Poetry linked to cooking

Non- Chronological Report – Christmas booklet / Halloween

Lists and Captions – Christmas List/ captions for Christmas Photos

 

Supporting texts

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (and alternative versions)

Mog’s Christmas

 

 

Stories From Other Cultures- The Enormous Crocodile

Newspaper article – The Enormous Crocodile

Poetry on a Theme – Jungle Animal Poetry

Information texts – Animal Factfiles

Persuasive Writing – Save the Rainforest

 

Supporting texts

Where the Wild Things Are

The Enormous Crocodile

 

 

Fantasy Stories- The Lonely Beast

Letter – Letter to a Friend

Instructions – How to make your own beast

Persuasive Writing – Save the Rainforest

 

Supporting texts

The Lonely Beast

 

 

 

Narrative – Write the next part of the story

Instructions – How to fly a rocket ship

Factfiles– Astronaut facts

Newspaper Article – Write about a space event

 

 

 

Supporting texts

Whatever Next

Narrative – plan and write a story in a similar style (Man on the Moon)

Recount- A day in the life of Bob

Non Fiction- writing –Space Booklets

Poetry – Humorous Poems and Limericks) Alien/ Space Poems

 

 

Supporting texts

The Man on the Moon

SPaG objectives

·          I can use a capital letter at the beginning of a sentence and for names.

·          I can use a full stop at the end of my sentence.

·          I can use finger spaces

·          I can compose a sentence orally, ready to replicate in writing.

·          I am able to form my letters correctly.

·          I can use ‘and’ to extend my sentences.

 

 

SPaG objectives

·          I can use adjectives in my sentences.

·          I am able to begin to join my letters cursively.

·          I can vary my sentences by using conjunctions such as ‘because’, ‘so’ and ‘but’.

 

 

·          I can begin to use a range of punctuation in my sentences including exclamation and question marks.

·          I can read my work out loud and write to the genre.

·          I can use the correct suffixes for my words and spell them correctly (ing, ed, er, est, s, and es).

 

Reading objectives

·          Apply phonic knowledge to decode words.

·          Respond with the correct sound to graphemes for all 40+ phonemes, including alternative sounds.

·          Read accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words.

·          Read most common exception words e.g. the, said, they, once, she, friend, school.

·          Read words with the endings -s, -es, -ing, -ed and -est.

·          Read words of more than one syllable.

·          Read contractions e.g. I’m, can’t, we’ll. Know that apostrophes represent omitted letters.

·          Read some phonically-decodable books, closely matched to phonic knowledge.

·          Read pseudo (alien) words with accuracy, including vowel digraphs and trigraphs.

·          Listen to, discuss and enjoy a wide range of poems and stories at a level beyond that which they can read independently.

·          Become familiar with key stories, fairy stories and traditional tales; retell them; know their characteristics.

·          Link what they read to their own experiences.

·          Recognise and join in with predictable phrases in poems and stories.

·          Appreciate some rhymes and poems; recite some by heart.

·          Discuss the meanings of new words, linking them to words already known.

·          Listen to, discuss and enjoy a range of non-fiction texts; draw on what they already know, and on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher.

·          Check that texts make sense when reading.

·          Talk about the significance of the title and events.

·          Infer on the basis of what is said and done e.g. know that Jack is scared of the giant because he is hiding; the princess is sad because she has lost her ring.

·          Make simple predictions about what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far e.g. the boy will be in trouble for stealing the buns.

·          Participate in discussion about what is read to them, taking turns and listening to others.

·          Explain clearly their understanding of what is read to them.

·           Listen to, discuss and enjoy a wide range of poems and stories at a level beyond that which they can read independently; offer contribution to discussion; raise questions; explain opinions.

 

Maths Place Value

Count to ten, forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, or from any given number. Count, read and write numbers to 10 in numerals and words. Identify and represent numbers using objects and pictorial representations including the number line, and use the language of: equal to, more than, less than (fewer), most, least. Given a number, identify one more or one less. Count in multiples of twos. Count to twenty, forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, from any given number. Count, read and write numbers from 1 to 20 in numerals and words. Identify and represent numbers using objects and pictorial representations including the number line, and use the language of: equal to, more than, less than (fewer), most, least. Count in multiples of twos and fives

 

Number: Addition and subtraction

Represent and use number bonds and related subtraction facts (within 10) Add and subtract one digit numbers (to 10), including zero. Read, write and interpret mathematical statements involving addition (+), subtraction (-) and equals (=) signs. Solve one step problems that involve addition and subtraction, using concrete objects and pictorial representations and missing number problems. Represent and use number bonds and related subtraction facts within 20. Add and subtract one digit and two digit numbers to 20, including zero. Read, write and interpret mathematical statements involving addition (+), subtraction (-) and equals (=) signs. Solve one step problems that involve addition and subtraction, using concrete objects and pictorial representations, and missing number problems such as 7= ? – 9

 

Geometry

Recognise and name common 2D and 3D shapes, including rectangles, squares, circles and triangles, cuboids, pyramids and spheres. Describe position, direction and movement, including whole, half, quarter and three quarter turns

Time

Tell the time to the hour and half past the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times. Recognise and use language relating to dates, including days of the week, weeks, months and years. Compare, describe and solve practical problems for time [for example, quicker, slower, earlier, later] and measure and begin to record time (hours, minutes, seconds). Sequence events in chronological order using language [for example, before and after, next, first, today, yesterday, tomorrow, morning, afternoon and evening].

 

Place Value

Count to 40 forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, or from any number. Count, read and write numbers from 1 – 40 in numerals and words. Identify and represent numbers using objects and pictorial drawings. Given a number, identify 1 more or 1 less.

 

Number: Addition and Subtraction

Add and subtract one digit and two digit numbers to 40, including zero. Add and subtract numbers using concrete objects, pictorial representations, and mentally, including: a two digit number and ones; a two digit number and tens; two two digit numbers; adding three digit numbers. Read, write and interpret mathematical statements involving addition (+), subtraction (-) and equals (=) signs. Solve one step problems that involve addition and subtraction, using concrete objects and pictorial representations and missing numbers

 

 

 

Measures: Length and Height

Compare, describe and solve practical problems for lengths and heights [for example, long/short, longer/ shorter, tall/short, double/half]. Measure and begin to record lengths and heights.

 

Number: Multiplication and Division

Count in multiples of twos, fives and tens. Solve one step problems involving multiplication and division, by calculating the answer using concrete objects, pictorial representations and arrays with the support of the teacher.

 

Number: Fractions

Recognise, find and name a half as one of two equal parts of an object, shape or quantity. Recognise, find and name a quarter as one of four equal parts of an object, shape or quantity.

Place Value

Count to and across 100, forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, or from any given number. Count, read and write numbers from 1-100 in numerals and words. Identify and represent numbers using objects and pictorial representations including the number line, and use the language of: equal to, more than, less than, most, least. Given a number, identify one more and one less.

 

Number: Four Operations

Represent and use number bonds and related subtraction facts within 20. Add and subtract one digit and two digit numbers to 20, including 0. Read, write and interpret mathematical statements involving addition (+) subtraction (-) and equals (=) signs. Solve one step problems that involve addition and subtraction, using concrete objects and pictorial representations, and missing number problems. Count in multiples of twos, fives and tens. Solve one step problems involving multiplication and division, by calculating the answer using concrete objects, pictorial representations and arrays with the support of the teacher.

 

Measurement: Money

Recognise and know the value of different denominations of coins and notes. Solve one step problems that involve addition and subtraction, using concrete objects and pictorial representations, and missing number problems.

 

 

Measurement: Weight and Volume

Compare, describe and solve practical problems for mass/weight [for example, heavy/light, heavier than, lighter than]; capacity and volume [for example, full/empty, more than, less than, half, half full, quarter] Measure and begin to record mass/weight, capacity and volume.

Science

 

Animals including humans

·         Identify and name common animals and group them

·         Identify animals that are carnivores, omnivores and herbivores

·         Identify and compare the structure of animals i.e. fish, birds

·         Identify parts of the human body and say which parts of the body are associated with each sense

 

Everyday materials

·           distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made

·            identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass, metal, water, and rock

·            describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials

·          compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties.

Seasonal Change

·  observe changes across the four seasons

·   observe and describe weather associated with the seasons and how day length varies.

·  Design a shelter for a jungle animal that can protect them in jungle weathers

Plants

·  identify and name a variety of common wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees

·  identify and describe the basic structure of a variety of common flowering plants, including trees.

Topic Based Science

·  To know what the solar system is

·  To be able to name parts of the solar system and the planets

·  To understand the job of the Sun

·  To know some of the characteristics of planets and moons

Scientific Enquiry

·  asking simple questions and recognising that they can be answered in different ways

·   observing closely, using simple equipment

·   performing simple tests

·   identifying and classifying

·   using their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions

·   gathering and recording data to help in answering questions.

Computing ·          recognise common uses of information technology beyond school

·          use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.

·           understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions

·          create and debug simple programs

·          use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.

·          Create Ozobot maps for Snow White to escape the evil queen

·          use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.

·          use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs

·          Create lists on what will be needed to create shelters for jungle animals

·          use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.

·          use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content

·          use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.

·          Create Space Factfiles – using 2simple

·          use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.

·          Create a class poetry book with humorous poems

PE Gymnastics – Points and patches, bouncing, jumping and landing, apparatus work and rocking and rolling.

 

Dance – The Magic Faraway Tree

 

·         I can and copy simple skills and actions.

·         I can change my body shape in a number of ways.

·         I can perform simple and random dance moves.

·         I can show some rhythm in dance.

·         I can copy and remember simple actions in a sequence.

·         I am able to work with a partner.

·         I am able to stretch and explore simple shapes.

·         I am beginning to develop my balance.

·         I can jump and roll in different ways.

 

 

Games- Bat and ball skills and developing partner work.

 

Team games – Netball, Dodgeball and Tag Rugby.

 

·         I can move a ball and use simple throwing techniques

·         I can pass a ball to a partner using my hands and feet.

·         I can begin to use simple equipment to move a ball.

·         I can sometimes catch a ball.

·         I can play simple ball games involving kicking, catching or throwing

·         I am able to work with a partner

·         I can start to link skills and actions within simple games.

·         I have begun to understand some concepts of game eg. Opponent, team mate etc.

 

 

Athletics – Jumping, running and field games.

 

·         I can comment on others’ actions.

·         I can suggest simple improvements.

·         I can talk about how my body feels during activity.

·     I can understand that physical activity is good for me.

 

History

 

What is a kingdom and who runs it now and has ran it in the past?

 

·          Identify old and new from pictures and artefacts.

 

·          Read stories about kings and queens of the past

 

·          Observe and handle artefacts from the past

 

 

·          Identify some similarities and differences between their own lives and those of people who lived in the past. (Modern day child’s life/ Victorian child)

 

·          Find out about significant kings and queens in the past

 

Find out why people such as Henry VIII acted as he did

What is a jungle and who lives there?

 

·          Recount changes that have occurred in their own lives.

 

·          Look at the difference in the rain forest from now compared to in the past. What is Space?

 

·          Recount changes that have occurred in their own lives. (Tim Peake/ Chris Hatfield)

 

·          Know some of the main events and significant people studied in a topic. (Tim Peake/ Chris Hatfield/ Neil Armstrong)

 

·          Use simple words and phrases to describe the past – after, before, between.

 

·          Arrange objects in order of their age. (Space/ planet timeline)

 

·          Begin to use very simple time lines to order some recent events with some annotations. (Space exploration timeline)

 

 

 

·          Use simple words and phrases to describe the past – after, before, between.

 

·          Arrange objects in order of their age. (Space/ planet timeline)

 

·          Begin to use very simple time lines to order some recent events with some annotations. (Space exploration timeline)

 

Geography  

·          Create a plan to mark a known route. (Castles)

 

·          Identify where they have been on holiday using a map. (Holiday news)

 

·          Know the main aspects of the British Isles using maps.

 

·          Talk about places seen in books, videos, and internet.

 

·          Describe different types of buildings. (Castles/ homes)

·          Know that places are linked by paths or roads.

 

·          Draw simple plans and maps of a known area/made up place and talk about them.

 

·          Arrange objects in order of their age. (Plants/ trees)

 

·          Look at and discuss books about places. (Jungles and rainforests)

 

·          Explore maps, globes and atlases.

 

·          Draw simple plans and maps of a known area/made up place and talk about them. (Create maps for jungles/ animals habitats)

 

·          Identify, and with support label the world’s continents and oceans.

 

 

·          Describe places using their characteristics and simple geographical vocabulary – e.g house, street, wood. (Comparison of town/ jungle)

 

 

 

·          Create a plan to mark a known route. (Man on the Moon S. Bartram)

 

·          Talk about places seen in books, videos, and internet.

 

·         Understand the concept of close and far away.

 

·          Use digital cameras to take photographs and record what they have seen. (Keeping a moon diary)

 

 

RE ·          That Christians think of God as creator

·          To examine what we have to be thankful for.

·          To discuss how and why we should care for the planet.

·          To understand the creation story.

·          To use poetry to retell the creation story.

·          To explore how Christians say thank you to God.

·          To reflect on what in the natural world we can be thankful for.

·          To describe a place which causes them awe and wonder.

·          To understand the significance of advent.

·          To understand traditions and symbols which signify advent (calendars)

·          To understand Mary and Joseph’s journey to Bethlehem

·          To explore the journey of the shepherds

·          To examine the visit of the Three Kings

·          To discuss traditions at Christmas

·          To make a Christingle and explore its symbolism.

·          To explore how we are unique and special.

·          To explore our inward qualities.

·          To explore Jesus’ inward and outward qualities.

·          To explore Jesus teaching on how to treat others – The Good Samaritan

·          To understand Jesus was special because of his miracles – Jairus daughter.

·          To understand that Jesus has power – The Lame Man

·          To understand how Jesus was special in death.

·          To understand that our behaviour is important – following rules

·          To understand how we can love one another

·          To explore the idea of Lent.

·          To understand why the religious leaders didn’t like Jesus

·          To explore what happened on the cross

·          To understand where Jesus went after his death.

·          To develop an understanding of Shabbat

·          To understand what is meant by tradition

·          To understand the term, Mitzvah and explore its meaning

·          To explore Jewish artefacts and discuss their purpose

·          To explore how Judaism affects lifestyle – Kosher foods

·          To explore what makes a Jewish kitchen distinctive.

·          To understand the word the word ‘community’.

·          To explore the school community

·          To examine a family community – Family tree

·          To explore the church community.

·          To understand how Christians are welcomed into the church community – baptism

·          To understand how Christian weddings are the start of a new family

Art/DT

 

Comparing food from the past and present

·           explore and evaluate a range of existing products

·          understand the similarities and differences between Tudor food and modern day food

Design and make a castle

·          build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable

·          evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria

·          select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing]

·           design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria

 

 

 

 

Jungle masks and animal sculptures

 

·          to use a range of materials creatively to design and make products

·          to use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination

·          to develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space

·          build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable

 

Robert T McCall

·     Describe and explain similarities and difference between their own and other artists work.

·     to use a range of materials creatively to design and make products

·      to use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share their ideas, experiences and imagination

·     to develop a wide range of art and design techniques in using colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space

Enterprise project

·          Describe how a commercial product works

·          Recognise what they have done well and talk about what could be improved

·          Seek out the views and judgements of others

·          Predict how changes will improve the finished product

·          Explain why some products are useful/not useful

·          Say how the product will be useful to the user

·          Use digital photography to present design or finished work

Music Medieval Music

 

·          Listen to simple elements of music.

·          Verbally recall what they have heard with simple vocabulary. I.e loud, soft, high low etc.

·          Identify a strong, steady pulse in music.

·          Identify simple repeated rhythmic patterns.

 

Christmas songs

 

·          Confidently use their own voices in many different ways.

·          Know how to use high, low and middle voice.

·          Sing songs with more accurate pitch.

In the Groove

·       Maintain a simple part in a round.

·          Perform simple accompaniments and simple rhythmic parts.

·          Play tuned and un-tuned instruments

 

Zootime

 

·          How to listen to music.

·          To sing the song.

● To play the accompanying instrumental parts with or without notated scores (optional).

·          To work together in a band/ensemble.

Hey You

 

·           To experience and learn how to apply key musical concepts/elements, eg finding a pulse, clapping a rhythm, use of pitch.

·           To recognise the style of the music and to understand its main style indicators.

·          To understand and use general musical vocabulary and specific vocabulary linked to the song

Revision and revisit

 

Revision of all of the skills and objectives over the year

 

 

 

Personal, Social and Emotional Development SEAL Health and Wellbeing

·         To be aware of the process of growing from young to old and how people’s needs change.

·         To know the names for the main parts of the body (including external genitalia) and similarities and differences between boys and girls.

·         To know the rules for and ways of keeping physically safe (including safety online, the responsible use of ICT, the differences between secrets and surprises and understanding not to keep adults’ secrets; road safety, cycle safety and safety in the environment) (SEAL)

·         To know who to go to if they are worried and how to attract their attention. (SEAL)

·         To recognise that they share a responsibility for keeping themselves and others safe, when to say “yes”, “no”, “I’ll ask” and “I’ll tell”.

·         To recognise that there are different types of bullying, that these are wrong and unacceptable. (SEAL)

·         To know how to resist teasing or bullying, if they experience or witness it, whom to go to and how to get help. (SEAL)

Relationships

·         To identify their special people (family, friends, carers), what makes them special and how special people should care for one another. (SEAL)

·         To judge what kind of physical contact is acceptable, comfortable, unacceptable and uncomfortable and how to respond (including who to tell and how to tell them)

·         To recognise that people’s bodies and feelings can be hurt (including what makes them feel comfortable and uncomfortable)

·         To recognise when people are being unkind to them or others, how to respond, who to tell and what to say. (SEAL)

·         To know that some household products, including medicines, can be harmful if not used properly. (Health and Wellbeing)

Living in the wider world

·         To know what improves and harms their local, natural and built environments and about some of the ways people look after them.

·         To know that money comes from different sources and can be used for different purposes, including the concepts of spending and saving.

·         To know about the role money plays in their lives including how to manage their money, keep it safe, choices about spending money and what influences those choices.

French Greetings

 

·         listen to and repeat French vocabulary for greetings and feelings

·          Match pictures to the French vocabulary

 

Numbers 1 – 20

 

 

·          Listen to and repeat French vocabulary for colours

·          Match pictures and copy write French vocabulary

Colours

 

·          Listen to and repeat French vocabulary for colours

·          Match pictures and copy write French vocabulary

Download Year 1 Curriculum

YEAR 2 - 2018/19

Year 2 Curriculum Map 2018 – 2019

Subject Autumn 1 Autumn 2 Spring 1 Spring 2 Summer 1 Summer 2
Core text/Theme London – The Big Smoke The Robot and the Bluebird Explorers The Diary of a Killer Cat – Anne Fine Art Attack

 

The BFG
 

English

 

 

Recount – diary from someone who was there

Newspaper reports- The fire and rebuilding

Information texts – tourist guide to London

Shape poetry

Narrative – fantasy story retelling and creating characters

 

Supporting texts

Samuel Pepys Diary

Vlad and the Great Fire of London

You wouldn’t want to be in the Great Fire of London

 

 

Instructions – how to make a robot

Persuasive writing -giving reasons why the robot should continue on his journey

Letters

Narrative – Retelling the story and writing an alternative ending

 

Supporting texts

 

The owl who was afraid of the dark (GR)

 

 

 

 

Non–chronological report Christopher Columbus

Recount – Sailor’s diary

Narrative – Grandad’s Island

Letter – in a bottle

Explanation texts – building a shelter

Poetry – Creating class book of poems (traditional poems)  e.g. Sea Poems, A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson

 

Supporting texts

 

Skulduggery (GR)

Pirate school : just a bit of wind

Once in a life time – Literacy shed

Diary entries – contrasting language used by various characters

Information texts – Domestic cats vs wild cats

Narrative – Retelling a known story writing from a different view point.

Writing a sequel including Tuffy and additional characters.

 

 

Supporting texts

The Hodgeheg – DKS (GR)

Narrative – plan and write a story in a similar style

Instructions – making stick puppets

Play scripts for puppet shows

Non Fiction- writing –Artist research – Lowry

Poetry – Contemporary (living authors) e.g. Michael Rosen, J.Donaldson – poems to perform

 

Supporting texts

Katie and the British artists

The day the crayons quit

Bob the Artist

 

Narrative – character descriptions comparing vocabulary used for heroes and villains.

Fantasy stories creating our own magical lands

Drama

Non Fiction writing – dictionary and glossary work with real and made up words

Poetry – Contemporary (living authors) e.g. Michael Rosen, J.Donaldson – poems to perform

Repeating pattern and nonsense poems

 

Reading – guided reading based around whole class text.

SPaG Objectives ●      Use capital letters for some proper nouns and the personal pronoun ‘I’.

●      Write sentences which are usually grammatically accurate, sequenced to form short narratives; combine words to form single clause sentences.

●      Begin to co-ordinate some sentences using and, or, but.

●      Demarcate some sentences with capital letter and full stops.

●      Begin to identify some of the following word classes: noun, adjective, verb and adverb.

●      Recognise past and present tense verbs and, with support, attempt to maintain tense orally and in writing.

●      Accurately spell words using suffixes e.g. un-, -ing, -ed, -er and -est where the root does not change.

●      Demarcate most sentences in their writing with capital letters and full stops.

●      Use question marks correctly when required.

●      Use co-ordination (e.g. or / and / but) to join clauses.

●      Use some subordination (e.g. when / if / that / because) to join clauses.

●      Use varied vocabulary to create detail and interest, including adjectives to make noun phrases.

●      Use present and past tense mostly correctly and consistently.

●      Begin to show an awareness of how to spell words with the suffixes–ment, -ness, -ful, -less, -ly, including those requiring a change to the root word.

●      Spell many common exception words from Y2 spelling appendix

●      Write a range of sentence structures which are grammatically accurate e.g. commands, questions and statements.

●      Vary the ways in which clauses are joined, whether by co-ordination (using and, or, but) or subordination (when, if, because).

●      Consistently use varied vocabulary to create detail and interest.

●      Choose and use present and past tense mostly correctly and consistently.

●      Begin to spell some common contractions with increasing accuracy e.g. it’s, can’t, didn’t and to mark singular possession e.g. Mark’s football.

 

Reading objectives The following objectives will be taught and reinforced throughout the year:

●      Read familiar books accurately and fluently, checking the text makes sense to them, and correcting inaccurate reading.

●      Listen to, discuss and express views about a wide range of contemporary and classic poetry, some of which they can read independently.

●      Listen to, discuss and express views about a wide range of stories at a level beyond that which they can read independently. Take account of what others say.

●      Show understanding of texts read independently; self-correct.

●      Know and retell a wide range of stories, fairy stories and traditional tales.

●      Discuss the sequence of events in books and how items of information are related.

●      In a book they read accurately and fluently, make inferences on the basis of what is said and done.

●      Discuss and express views about a range of non-fiction texts which are structured in different ways.

●      Recognise simple recurring literary language in stories and poetry.

●      Recite a repertoire of poems learnt by heart, using appropriate intonation.

Maths Number –place value

●         Count in steps of 2, 3 and 5 from 0 and in tens from any number, forward and backward.

●         Recognise the place value of each digit in a two digit number (tens, ones)

●         Identify, represent and estimate numbers to 100 using different representations including the number line.

 

Number –addition and subtraction

●         Recall and use addition and subtraction facts to 20 fluently, and derive and use related facts up to 100.

●         Add and subtract numbers using concrete objects, pictorial representations, and mentally, including: a two digit number and ones; a two digit number and tens; two two digit numbers; adding three one digit numbers.

 

Multiplication and Division

●         Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 times tables, including recognising odd and even numbers.

●         Calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division within the multiplication tables and write them using the multiplication (x), division (÷) and equals (=) sign.

Measurement: Money

●         Recognise and use symbols of pounds (£) and pence (p); combine amounts to make a particular value

 

Multiplication and Division

●         Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 times tables, including recognising odd and even numbers.

●         Calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division within the multiplication tables and write them using the multiplication (x), division (÷) and equals (=) sign.

 

Geometry -properties of shape

●         Identify and describe the properties of 2D shapes, including the number of sides and line symmetry in a vertical line.

●         Identify and describe the properties of 3D shapes, including the number of edges, vertices and faces.

●         Use mathematical vocabulary to describe position, direction and movement, including movement in a straight line and distinguishing between rotation as a turn and in terms of right angles for quarter, half and three quarter turns.

 

Number – fractions

●         Recognise, find, name and write fractions ½, ¼, ¾, 2/4 of a length, shape, set of objects or quantity.

●         Write simple fractions for example, ½ of 6 = 3

●         Recognise the equivalence of 2/4 and 1/2

 

Measurement: length and height

●         Choose and use appropriate standard units to estimate and measure length/height in any direction (m/cm) to the nearest appropriate unit, using rulers and scales.

 

Statistics

●         Interpret and construct simple pictograms, tally charts, block diagrams and simple tables.

 

Measurement: Time

●         Tell and write the time to five minutes, including quarter past/to the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times.

●         Know the number of minutes in an hour and the number of hours in a day.

●         Compare and sequence intervals of time.

 

Measurement: Capacity, mass and temperature

●         Choose and use appropriate standard units to estimate and measure capacity (litres/ml), mass (kg/g) and temperature (oC) to the nearest appropriate unit, using thermometers and measuring vessels.

●         Compare and order volume/capacity and record the results using >, < and =

Position and direction

●         Use mathematical vocabulary to describe position

●         Order and arrange combinations of mathematical objects in patterns and sequences

●         Use mathematical vocabulary to describe movement, including movement in a straight line

 

Problem solving and efficient methods

●         Solve number problems with number facts and place value

●         Solve problems involving multiplication and division, using materials, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods, and multiplication and division facts, including problems in contexts

●         Check subtraction calculations using addition calculations by adding in a different order

●         Solve problems with addition and subtraction using concrete objects and pictorial representations, including those involving numbers, quantities and measures; applying their increasing knowledge of mental and written methods

●         Apply reasoning to solve problems efficiently

 

Consolidation work

 

Science

 

Animals including humans

●        notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults

●        find out about and describe the basic needs of animals, including humans, for survival (water, food and air)

●        describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene

 

Everyday materials

● identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses

● find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching

 

Everyday materials

● identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses

● Investigate floating and sinking

● Design and make waterproof outfit for an explorer

 

Living things and their habitats

● explore and compare the differences between things that are living, dead, and things that have never been alive

● identify that most living things live in habitats to which they are suited and describe how different habitats provide for the basic needs of different kinds of animals and plants, and how they depend on each other

● identify and name a variety of plants and animals in their habitats, including microhabitats

● describe how animals obtain their food from plants and other animals, using the idea of a simple food chain, and identify and name different sources of food

Plants

● observe and describe how seeds and bulbs grow into mature plants

● find out and describe how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy

 

Plants

● Explore plants in the local area

● Learn about how plants and animals are dependent on each other

● Look at plants from outside our local area

Computing Digital literacy

●        Recognise how to use technology respectfully.

●         Complete ROAR/MeOnline online E-safety activities.

●         Discuss and understand the school’s e-Safety SMART rules

●         Explore what cyber bulling means and how to deal with it

 

Computer Science

●  Know that devices and actions on screen may be controlled by sequences of actions and instructions

●  Create a sequence of instructions to control a programmable robot to carry out a pre-determined route to include direction, distance and turn (on screen or floor robot)

Information technology

●      Recognise different ways of using ICT and decide which to use

●      Begin to word process short narrative and non-narrative texts

●      Develop basic editing skills including different presentational features (font size, colour and style)

●      Save, print, retrieve and amend work

●      Use key words to find information on the Internet

Digital literacy

●         Learn how to keep personal information private.

●         Understand that not everyone they meet online is automatically trustworthy   (Magda and Mo)

●         Know what to do if they find something inappropriate online

 

Information technology

●      Change digital content including photos and video.

●      Make a simple slide show e.g. using digital photos

●      Use clipart to add and resize a picture

●      Use shortcuts to insert objects and delete them

●      Confidently find things on the internet

 

Computer Science

● To create a complex group of commands.

● Create a sequence of precise instructions. E.g. Create a right-angled shape on screen

● Predict what might happen when controlling

● Control a range of control devices such as cameras, sound recorders and other devices

PE Games

(throwing and catching)

 

●  Throw a ball underarm, over arm and use a bounce pass.

●  Can move into a given space to catch a ball.

●  Can pass a ball to a partner using his/her hands and feet.

 

Gym

(high and low movements)

 

●  Copy stretching movements for different parts of the body.

●  Balance using his/her hands, feet or seat.

●  Copy short movements to combine simple balances. e.g. balance – travel – balance

 

Games

(Making up a game)

 

●  Move into a given space within a game.

 

Dance

(fast and slow movements)

●      Can perform basic dance actions e.g. travel and change direction, turn, jump, gesture, balance/stillness, change of size and shape.

●      Can copy short motifs (a short phrase, movement or gesture that is repeated.)

Gym

(creating travelling routines)

 

●  Copy short movements to combine simple balances. e.g. balance – travel – balance

 

Dance

(under the sea inspired dances)

●      Can copy short motifs (a short phrase, movement or gesture that is repeated.)

●      Can link two or more actions together.

Gym

(Rolling, spinning & twisting)

●    Create different shapes when balancing e.g. thin, wide, twisted, curled.

●    Perform simple rolls e.g. forward, pencil, teddy-bear

Dance

(Animal movements)

●  He/she can link two or more actions together.

Games

(Dribbling, kicking and hitting)

●      Can hit a ball with a tennis style bat or racquet.

●      Can stop a ball with his/her feet before passing it.

●    Can pass a ball to a partner using his/her hands and feet.

 

Athletics

(track)

 

●  Sprint up to 60m.

●  Can run 100m.

Games

(group games and inventing games)

 

●  Move into a given space within a game.

●  Gain an understanding where to stand to make a game more difficult for an opponent.

 

 

 

Athletics

(field)

 

●  Use over arm and underarm throws to throw items in a straight line.

●  Can jump: side to side; both feet together; one foot to the other

 

History

 

How has London changed?

●  Show an understanding of the main elements of stories that they have heard about the past.

●  Create written recounts of stories that they have heard about the past.

●  Organise historical studies in to a broad time order using dates in a variety of forms, including days, months and years.

●  Recognise that there are reasons why people acted as they did in the past, beginning to explore more than one view point.

●  Understand and use evidence to explain some reasons for differences between the time being studies and now (transport, food, clothes, hygiene)

●  Begin to use historical knowledge to make connections between local and regional history – understand similarities and differences between the Fire of Newcastle and Gateshead/design and build of bridges

Who was Christopher Columbus and how have his discoveries impacted upon our lives?

 

●  Understand the term significant and be able to discuss and write about the lives of a significant individual and how their life has impacted ours (land discoveries).

●  Identify any important changes that happened at the time being studied, explaining the reasons why they are important with reference to the past and now.

●  Use more complex phrases to describe time (a long time ago, centuries, decades)

 

Who was Lowry and why did he choose to paint this way?

 

●      Historical study of Lowry & other famous artists

 

Geography How do people travel in London?

●  Create maps and plans including simple keys for a variety of purposes – London bus routes,

●  Identify features on a map – capital city, landmarks/bridges

What does a map tell us?

●    Hypothesise about, and prove changes in weather and seasons using a range of evidence.

●  Describe hot and cold areas of the world with reference to the equator, North and South Poles.

●    Identify features on a map.

●  Create maps and plans including simple keys and grid references for a variety of purposes (Journeys and local map making).

●  Name, locate and label the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom

●  Know physical and human features of different areas

 

 

What did Columbus discover?

●  Confidently name, locate and label the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas on a map.

●  Name, locate and label the main regions of the world including the world’s continents, oceans, tropics and the equator (link to weather)

●  Know physical and human features of different areas and use these to identify what sort of place it is.

Why don’t Big Cats live in England?

●  Choose and use a variety of evidence to explain geographical similarities and differences between a small area in the UK and a contrasting non-European country.

●  Describe hot and cold areas of the world with reference to the equator, North and South Poles.

●  Use a range of sources to devise relevant geographical questions and investigate these.

●  Select and use a large range of geographical vocabulary to accurately describe and compare physical and human features of a place.

●   Comparisons using geographical and human features, weather etc – investigation where different big cats live

What is the Geography of where I live like?

●  Use compass directions and locational language (near and far) to describe the location of features and routes on a map.

●  Mark local locations on a map of the UK – our town, our school visit, my holiday.

●  Take and use digital photographs to record observations and explain findings.

●  Create detailed sketches whilst on fieldwork, using specific geographical vocabulary to label diagrams. (sketches of the local area/ponteland park)

●  Collect, analyse and communicate information in tally charts and tables (car spotting/bird watching).

●  Use aerial photographs to identify landmarks and describe land use and other geographical features.

●  Know that places are linked by paths or roads and explain how these are different depending on the location (Changes in Ponteland).

●  Express their views about local area and environments using evidence to justify their views.

Use vocabulary of size to classify- hamlet, town, city.

●    Use compass directions and locational language (near and far) to describe the location of features and routes on a map.

●    Following directions and maps he/she can use a simple plan to follow a route. e.g. A route around the school or local area or his/her route from home to school

 

RE Christianity

●         To explore the qualities of a good parent.

●         To understand that God is a loving father – what God thinks of us.

●         To understand how precious we are to God – The Lost Sheep

●         To explore how loving others shows love for God

●         To understand God as life giver – made in his image

●         To understand that God provides for his people – Harvest

●         To explore how Christians follow God’s example to help those in need – Tearfund

Judaism

●         To understand the story of Hanukkah

●         To draw comparisons between Hanukkah and Christmas.

●         To evaluate kosher foods.

●         To compare and contrast Hanukkah and Diwali

 

 

Christianity

●         To understand that Jesus is known as light of the world.

●         To understand that Jesus birth was special from the outset.

●         To understand the events surrounding Jesus birth.

●         To understand the significance of Jesus special visitors.

 

Christianity

●         To value diversity and not fear it – understanding our unique features and personalities.

●         To explore how Jesus treated those who were different or outcast.

●         To understand Jesus teaching on loving our neighbours.

●         To explore Christian’s need for forgiveness

Judaism

●         To understand how Jews’ faith are shaped by the Torah – The Ten Commandments

●         To understand the Jewish festival of Passover

●         To understand how a Jew’s home is different to a non-Jew.

 

Christianity

●         To explore Jesus temptation in the desert.

●         To compare and contrast Jesus’ entrance into Jerusalem to the Queen’s entrance.

●         To explore the question ‘why did Jesus have to die?’

●         To understand the views of the religious leaders towards Jesus

●         To explore what happened to Jesus on the cross.

●         Explore the question, ‘what evidence is there that death was not the end?’

Judaism

●         To explore Jewish journeys – The journey of Abraham and Sarah

●         To understand the timeline of God’s people

●         To explore Joseph’s journey to Egypt

●         To explore the journey of Jacob and his sons

●         To explore the journey of the Israelites out of Egypt

Christianity

●         To understand who Jesus is and what he came to do – Jesus in the temple

●         To understand the affect Jesus had on the people he met –the disciples

●         To understand what made Jesus famous

●         To understand Jesus teaching – Jesus teaches about worry

●         To explore Jesus power – Calming the storm

●         To explore Jesus power to create out of little – Jesus feeds the five thousand

Art/DT

 

Comparing food from the past and present

●         Understand and use the terms ingredient and component

●         Use simple scales or balances

●         Understand main rules of food hygiene

 

Design and make a robot that can move

●  Experience using natural and manmade materials.

●  Talk about how moving objects work

●  Use wheels, slide and levers in plans

●  Follow basic safety rules

●  Use plans to show how to put their ideas into practice

●  Draw pictures with labels , with some text

●  Use their knowledge of some working characteristics of materials when designing

●  Use wheels, sliders and levers in plans

 

 

 

 

Design and make waterproof outfit for an explorer

Design and make a boat that floats

 

●  Explain how they have made their model/product describing the process.

●  Choose from a range of materials to design and make different products.

●  Select appropriate equipment needed to work with different materials.

●  Measure out and cut fabric

●  Use a simple template for cutting out

●  Practice skills before using them

●  Use simple finishing techniques

 

Animal masks

 

Mix colours and describe how to make them.

 

Control paint and water to mix paint of different thicknesses.

 

Lowry

●    Continue to develop their knowledge of the work of a range of artists, craft makers and designers.

●    Describe and explain similarities and difference between their own and other artists work.

●    Experiment with different practices to begin to create pieces using a similar style.

●    Choose from a range of mediums to share their ideas, experiences and imagination.

●    Choose and use a wide range of art and design techniques with different drawing and painting tools.

Enterprise project

●         Describe how a commercial product works

●         Recognise what they have done well and talk about what could be improved

●         Seek out the views and judgements of others

●         Predict how changes will improve the finished product

●         Explain why some products are useful/not useful

●         Say how the product will be useful to the user

●         Use digital photography to present design or finished work

Music Music from the past and present

 

●         Listen to simple elements of music.

●         Verbally recall what they have heard with simple vocabulary. I.e loud, soft, high low etc.

●         Identify a strong, steady pulse in music.

●         Identify simple repeated rhythmic patterns.

 

Christmas songs

 

●         Confidently use their own voices in many different ways.

●         Know how to use high, low and middle voice.

●         Sing songs with more accurate pitch.

Sea chants and songs

 

●      Maintain a simple part in a round.

●         Sing a wider range of songs from memory.

●         Perform simple accompaniments and simple rhythmic parts.

●         Beat out short rhythms and repeat short rhythmic patterns.

 

Animal ensemble

 

●         Follow verbal instructions.

●         Keep a steady pulse.

●         Begin to understand tempo, rhythm and tone.

●         Imitate changes in pitch with tuned instruments.

●         Name a range of instruments.

 

Exploring timbre, tempo, dynamics

 

●         Create short melodic patterns and rhythmic phrases.

●         Choose sounds to represent two contrasting things in different ways. E.G – a sough sea and a calm sea

●         Make sequences of sounds and combine short and long sounds.

Performing

 

 

Uses given symbols to record long and short sounds.

Begin to gain a sense of occasion when performing.

 

Personal, Social and Emotional Development SEAL Health and Wellbeing

●        To be aware of the process of growing from young to old and how people’s needs change.

●        To know the names for the main parts of the body (including external genitalia) and similarities and differences between boys and girls.

●        To know the rules for and ways of keeping physically safe (including safety online, the responsible use of ICT, the differences between secrets and surprises and understanding not to keep adults’ secrets; road safety, cycle safety and safety in the environment) (SEAL)

●        To know who to go to if they are worried and how to attract their attention. (SEAL)

●        To recognise that they share a responsibility for keeping themselves and others safe, when to say “yes”, “no”, “I’ll ask” and “I’ll tell”.

●        To recognise that there are different types of bullying, that these are wrong and unacceptable. (SEAL)

●        To know how to resist teasing or bullying, if they experience or witness it, whom to go to and how to get help. (SEAL)

Relationships

●        To identify their special people (family, friends, carers), what makes them special and how special people should care for one another. (SEAL)

●        To judge what kind of physical contact is acceptable, comfortable, unacceptable and uncomfortable and how to respond (including who to tell and how to tell them)

●        To recognise that people’s bodies and feelings can be hurt (including what makes them feel comfortable and uncomfortable)

●        To recognise when people are being unkind to them or others, how to respond, who to tell and what to say. (SEAL)

●        To know that some household products, including medicines, can be harmful if not used properly. (Health and Wellbeing)

Living in the wider world

●        To know what improves and harms their local, natural and built environments and about some of the ways people look after them.

●        To know that money comes from different sources and can be used for different purposes, including the concepts of spending and saving.

●        To know about the role money plays in their lives including how to manage their money, keep it safe, choices about spending money and what influences those choices.

French Numbers 1 – 20

Healthy Eating

 

●        listen to and repeat French vocabulary for fruits and vegetables

●         Match pictures to the French vocabulary

●         Repeat numbers rhymes

Local Area

 

●         Listen to and repeat French vocabulary for shops and buildings in the local area

●         Match pictures and copy write French vocabulary

●         Begin to ask to buy items from a shop

 

Journeys

 

●         Listen to and repeat French vocabulary relating to transport

●         Label learnt modes of transport in French

 

Download Year 2 Curriculum

YEAR 3 - 2018/19

Subject Autumn 1 Autumn 2 Spring 1 Spring 2 Summer 1 Summer 2
Core text/Theme BLAST FROM THE PAST HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON SAVE OUR PLANET The Wilderness War THE PUZZLE OF THE PYRAMIDS

 

THE SECRET SEVEN
English

 

Spell further homophones

 

Spell words that are often misspelt from the ¾ spelling list

 

Place the possessive apostrophe accurately in words with regular plurals

 

Use further prefixes and understand how to add them

 

Use further suffixes and understand how to add them

 

Increase the legibility, consistency and quality of their handwriting

 

Use the correct form of ‘a’ or ‘an’

 

 

 

Non-chronological report – life in an Anglo-Saxon settlement

 

Narrative – Create story based on a stone-age character

 

Newspaper report – The Viking invasion of Lindisfarne.

 

 

Supporting texts

Ug – Raymond Briggs

Pebble in my Pocket – Meredith Cooper/Chris Coady

 

 

Narrative – Character and mythical pet adventure

 

Poetry – Focus on personification of animals/creatures

 

Instructions – How to train your dragon

 

 

Supporting texts

 

The Iron Man – Ted Hughes

 

Persuasive text/letter – Why it is important to support endangered animals.

 

Discussion text – Discussing the importance of recycling

 

Instructions to recycle paper

 

 

 

 

 

 

Letter – a letter to prevent building from the point of view of characters in TWW

 

Play script

 

Poetry – Nature poems

 

 

Narrative – Write an adventure story

 

 

 

 

Narrative – Time travel Egyptian themed adventure story.

 

 

Explanation text – How the pyramids were built

 

 

Newspaper report – Tutankhamun found

 

Biography – Howard Carter.

 

 

Supporting texts

 

The Secret of the scarab beetle – William Meyer

 

Narrative – Write a mystery story based on the adventures of a secret society.

 

Instructions – How to build a successful secret club

 

 

Play script – Modern day version of Macbeth/SS

 

Supporting text

 

Macbeth – Shakespeare

 

 

Maths  

Number/ place value

 

Identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations.

 

Find 10 or 100 more or less than a given number; recognise the place value of each digit in a three digit number (hundreds, tens, ones).

 

Compare and order numbers up to 1000

 

Read and write numbers up to 1000 in numerals and in words.

 

Solve number problems and practical problems involving these ideas.

 

Count from 0 in multiples of 50 and 100

 

Number addition and subtraction

 

Add and subtract numbers mentally; including: a three digit number and ones; a three digit number and tens; a three digit number and hundreds

 

Add and subtract numbers with up to three digits, using formal written methods of columnar addition and subtraction

 

Estimate the answer to a calculation and use inverse operations to check answers.

 

Number addition and subtraction

 

Solve problems, including missing number problems, using number facts, place value, and more complex addition and subtraction

 

 

Number- multiplication and division

 

 

Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 3, 4 and 8 multiplication tables.

 

Calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division within the 3,4,8 x tables and write them correctly

 

Solve problems involving multiplication and division using material, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods and multiplication and division facts including problems in contexts

 

Show that multiplication of 2 numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and division of one number by another cannot.

 

Time for consolidation, gap filling, seasonal activities, assessments, etc.

 

 

Number – Multiplication and division

 

Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 3, 4 and 8 multiplication tables

 

Solve problems including missing number problems, involving multiplication and division, including problems using a scale.

 

Write and calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division using the multiplication tables they know, including for two digits numbers times one digit numbers using mental and progressing to formal written methods.

 

 

Measurement

 

Add and subtract amounts of money to give change, using both £ and p in practical contexts

 

 

Statistics

 

Interpret and present data using bar charts, pictograms and tables.

 

Solve one step and two step questions (for example, ‘How many more? and ‘How many fewer?) using information presented in scaled bar charts and pictograms and tables.

 

 

Measurement

 

Measure, compare, add and subtract length (mm,cm,m)

 

Solve problems including missing number problems using number facts, place value and more complex addition and subtraction.

 

Measure the perimeter of simple 2d shapes.

 

Continue to measure using the appropriate tools and units, progressing to using a wider range of measures, including comparing and using mixed and simple equivalents of mixed units.

 

Fractions

 

Recognise and use fraction as numbers: unit fractions and non-unit fractions with small denominators.

 

Recognise, find and write fractions of a discrete set of objects: unit fractions and non- unit fractions with small denominators.

 

Count up and down in tenths.

 

Recognise that tenths arise from dividing an object into 10 equal parts and in dividing one- digit numbers or quantities by 10.

 

 

Time for consolidation, gap filling, seasonal activities, assessments, etc.

 

 

 

Fractions

 

Recognise and show, using diagrams, equivalent fractions with small denominators.

 

Add and subtract fractions with the same denominator within one whale.

 

Compare and order unit fractions, and fractions with the same denominators.

 

Solve problems that involve all of the above.

 

 

Measurement

 

Tell and write the time from an analogue clock, including using Roman numerals and 12 and 24 hour clock.

 

Estimate and read time with increasing accuracy to the nearest minute.

 

Record and compare time in terms of seconds, minutes and hours.

 

Use vocabulary such as o’clock. a.m/p.m,, morning, afternoon, noon and midnight.

 

Know the number of seconds in a minute and the number of days in each month, year and leap year.

 

Compare durations of events (for example to calculate the time taken by particular events or tasks).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Measurement

 

Measure, compare, add and subtract: lengths (m/cm/mm); mass (kg/g); volume/ capacity (l/ml).

 

Solve problems, including missing number problems, using number facts, place value, and more complex addition and subtraction.

 

Continue to measure using the appropriate tools and units, progressing to using wider range of measures, including comparing and using mixed units (for example, 1kg and 200 g) and simple equivalents of mixed units (for example, 5m =500cm).

 

Geometry- properties of shape

 

Recognise angles as a property of shape or a description of a tur.

 

Identify right angles, recognise that two right angles make a half- turn, three make three quarters of a turn and four make a complete turn; identify whether angles are greater than or less than a right angle.

 

Identify horizontal and vertical lines and pairs of perpendicular and parallel lines.

 

Draw 2-D shapes and make 3-D shapes using modelling materials.

 

Recognise 3-D shapes in different orientations and describe them.

 

Time for consolidation, gap filling, seasonal activities, assessments, etc.

 

 

 

 

Science

 

Rocks and soils

Describe in simple terms how fossils are formed when things that have lived are trapped within the rock

 

Recognise that soils are made from rocks and organic matter.

Compare and group together different types of rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical properties.

Animals including humans

 

Identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.

Identify that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement.

 

Forces and magnets

 

Compare how things move on different surfaces

Notice that some forces need contact between two objects, but magnetic forces can act at a distance

Observe how magnets attract or repel each other and attract some materials but not others

Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of whether they are attracted to a magnet and identify some magnetic materials.

Describe magnets as having two poles

Predict whether two magnets will attract or repel each other

 

 

Plants

 

Explore the requirements for life and growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil and room to grow) and how they vary from plant to plant.

Identify and describe the functions of flowering plants; roots, stem/trunks, leaves and flowers.

Investigate the way in which water is transported in plants.

Explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal.

 

 

Light and shadow

 

Recognise that they need light to see things, and that darkness is the absence of light

Notice that light is reflected from surfaces

Recognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect their eyes

Recognise that shadows are formed when the light from a light source is blocked by a solid object

Find patterns in the way that the size of shadows change

 

Scientific enquiry

Asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them

Setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests

Making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers

 

Gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions

 

Recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables

 

Reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions

 

Using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions

 

Computing Computer Science

 

Algorithms

Explain what computer programming is and how algorithms work.

 

Google Docs skills

 

Identify computer components.

 

Understand how computers store data.

 

Understand how to share documents securely with others online.

 

Understand the opportunities computer networks offer for collaboration.

 

Ozobot track design

Control an object to move along a route.

 

 

 

Information technology

 

Google Docs skills challenge

 

To type quickly and correctly.

 

To type and design a printable document.

 

Cut, copy and paste between applications.

 

Use spell checker.

 

Delete, insert and replace text using mouse arrow keys.

 

 

 

Digital literacy

 

E Safety

 

Understand how computer networks can provide multiple services, such as the world wide web.

 

Understand the basic workings of computer networks.

 

Understand that not all information online is trustworthy.

 

Understand how to use technology responsibly

 

Recognise acceptable and unacceptable behaviour content.

 

 

Computer Science

 

Google Chrome music labs

Design, write and debug programs to achieve a specific goals, including solving problems.

Use sequence, selection and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output.

Use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms.

 

Information technology

 

Egyptian based project on Google Slides

 

To collect and combine information and data.

 

To create design content to accomplish a specific goal.

 

Analyse and evaluate information and data.

 

Digital Literacy

 

A year 1 guide about how to be safe online

 

 

Know and understand the five SMART rules.

 

Understand what is personal information and the importance of creating powerful passwords.

 

Understand the importance of showing respect online and how to achieve this.

 

PE Gymnastics

 

Create a routine resembling a battle from the stone age or viking invasion

 

Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance (for example, through athletics and gymnastics)

 

Move across the room indifferent ways with an awareness of space.

 

Make increasingly clear and fluid movements.

 

Understand the different uses of tense, relax, stretch, curl in movement.

 

Improvise with ideas and movements.

 

Copy, remember, repeat, and explore simple actions and movements with control and coordination.

 

Begin to sequence moves and link actions.

 

Begin to choose movement to show ideas.

 

Games

 

Play competitive games, modified where appropriate (for example, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis) and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending

Travel successfully to and from objects and locations on the ground

 

Choose simple approaches to problem solving and work cooperatively with others on tasks

 

Show an awareness of how to keep safe

 

Move a ball with control and accuracy

 

Show increasing confidence when rolling, hitting or kicking a ball.

 

Understand the importance of rules and fairness

 

Follow rules in games

 

Understand the concept of both team and opponent.

 

Develop and use simple tactics in team games.

 

 

 

Gymnastics

 

Create a routine resembling a battle from the stone age or viking invasion

 

Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance (for example, through athletics and gymnastics)

 

Move across the room indifferent ways with an awareness of space.

 

Make increasingly clear and fluid movements.

 

Understand the different uses of tense, relax, stretch, curl in movement.

 

Improvise with ideas and movements.

 

Copy, remember, repeat, and explore simple actions and movements with control and coordination.

 

Begin to sequence moves and link actions.

 

Begin to choose movement to show ideas.

 

Dance

 

Move across the room indifferent ways with an awareness of space.

 

Make increasingly clear and fluid movements.

 

Understand the different uses of tense, relax, stretch, curl in movement.

 

Improvise with ideas and movements.

 

Copy, remember, repeat, and explore simple actions and movements with control and coordination.

 

Begin to sequence moves and link actions.

 

Begin to choose movement to show ideas.

Swimming

 

Swim competently, confidently and proficiently over a distance of at least 25m.

 

Control their breathing and are comfortable on the surface and underwater swimming fluently and with control when using back crawl, front crawl and breaststroke.

 

Swim on their front and back using arm and leg actions with smooth coordination.

 

Use a range of strokes effectively (for example, front crawl, backstroke and breaststroke)

 

 

Gymnastics

 

Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance (for example, through athletics and gymnastics)

 

Move across the room indifferent ways with an awareness of space.

 

Make increasingly clear and fluid movements.

 

Understand the different uses of tense, relax, stretch, curl in movement.

 

 

Games

 

Play competitive games, modified where appropriate (for example, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis) and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending

Travel successfully to and from objects and locations on the ground

 

Choose simple approaches to problem solving and work cooperatively with others on tasks

 

Show an awareness of how to keep safe

 

Move a ball with control and accuracy

 

Show increasing confidence when rolling, hitting or kicking a ball.

 

Understand the importance of rules and fairness

 

Follow rules in games

 

Understand the concept of both team and opponent.

 

Develop and use simple tactics in team games.

 

Swimming

 

Swim competently, confidently and proficiently over a distance of at least 25m.

 

Control their breathing and are comfortable on the surface and underwater swimming fluently and with control when using back crawl, front crawl and breaststroke.

 

Swim on their front and back using arm and leg actions with smooth coordination.

 

Use a range of strokes effectively (for example, front crawl, backstroke and breaststroke)

Games

 

Play competitive games, modified where appropriate (for example, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis) and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending

Travel successfully to and from objects and locations on the ground

 

Choose simple approaches to problem solving and work cooperatively with others on tasks

 

Show an awareness of how to keep safe

 

Move a ball with control and accuracy

 

Show increasing confidence when rolling, hitting or kicking a ball.

 

Understand the importance of rules and fairness

 

Follow rules in games

 

Understand the concept of both team and opponent.

 

Develop and use simple tactics in team games.

 

Athletics

 

Use running, jumping, throwing and catching in isolation and in combination

 

Throw a javelin from standing position.

 

Practise varied throwing techniques including push throw.

 

Co-ordinate jumps to take off and land from either one or two feet.

 

Develop posture for running.

 

Recognise differences in long distance and short distance running.

 

Games

 

Play competitive games, modified where appropriate (for example, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis) and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending

Travel successfully to and from objects and locations on the ground

 

Choose simple approaches to problem solving and work cooperatively with others on tasks

 

Show an awareness of how to keep safe

 

Move a ball with control and accuracy

 

Show increasing confidence when rolling, hitting or kicking a ball.

 

Understand the importance of rules and fairness

 

Follow rules in games

 

Understand the concept of both team and opponent.

 

Develop and use simple tactics in team games.

 

Athletics

 

Use running, jumping, throwing and catching in isolation and in combination

 

Throw a javelin from standing position.

 

Practise varied throwing techniques including push throw.

 

Co-ordinate jumps to take off and land from either one or two feet.

 

Develop posture for running.

 

Recognise differences in long distance and short distance running.

 

History

 

How has Britain changed since the stone age?

 

Understand that some events from the past affect people’s lives today. (Look how Britain has changed over time, from the stone age until now).

 

Summarise the main events from a period in history, using their characteristics.

(Study the main purposes/jobs of specific groups of people from specific periods of time).

 

Sort events or objects into groups (Anglo-Saxon artefacts).

 

Use dates and terms accurately, using key dates when describing events.

 

Use some dates on a timeline (Stone Age- Vikings).

 

Understand the concept of decades and centuries and use this to divide the past into periods of time.

 

Use a timeline with dates, including both BC and AD.

 

Use evidence to describe changes within a time period.

 

 

 

Are humans destroying our planet?

Use more complex sources of primary and secondary information.

 

Use research to generate questions about the past.

 

Use the internet for research.

 

Choose and discriminate between a range of information and use this to ask questions.

 

Understand that events from the past are represented and interpreted in different ways and that sources can confirm or contradict.

 

Use a simple database to organise information.

 

Can we learn from Egyptian society?

Summarise the main events from a period in history, using their characteristics (Ancient Egyptian civilisation)

 

Guess what objects from the past were used for, using evidence to support answers.

 

Understand that some events from the past affect people’s lives today.

 

Give reasons for main events and changes, begin to understand why some people acted as they did and give reasons.

 

Geography  

Use atlases which show physical and human features

 

Use contents and index pages of an atlas.

 

Begin to name and locate the

countries of Europe and locate on a map. Link to origins of Vikings and Anglo Saxons.

 

 

 

Understand that different places may have a similar/different characteristics and give reasons for these.

 

Describe and identify how a place has changed.

 

 

 

Use prediction and prior knowledge to find out about unknown places, and combine this with observation..

 

Use a range of primary and secondary resources, including the internet, Google Earth and questionnaires

 

Suggest ways of presenting information, including graphically and in writing

 

Collect statistics and present them appropriately

 

Record information on charts and graphs and tables – look at recycling habits

 

 

Express views and recognise how people affect the environment, summarising the issues

 

Suggest ways of improving local environment

 

Understand how weather changes an environment

 

 

Understand that different places may have a similar/different characteristics and give reasons for these

 

Describe and identify how a place has changed (Egypt)

 

Identify the parts of a river, and land use around and how these can change peoples’ lives (with a focus on the River Nile).

 

 

Use atlases which show physical and human features

 

Use contents and index pages of an atlas.

RE Christianity

 

To learn about Old Testament stories which Christians believe reveal aspects of God.

To learn about the story of creation.

 

To examine ways in which Christians thank God through worship, caring for others and the environment.

 

To learn about Moses and the Exodus and discuss its meaning.

 

To understand how people have had to make great sacrifices because of their faith.

 

To understand the meaning of the word parable and how Jesus used them to teach a lesson.

 

To learn what the bible teaches about forgiveness –The Unforgiving Servant

 

To understand the story of The Rich Fool and Jesus teaching on doing the impossible.

 

To understand how God feels about his people – The Prodigal Son

Islam

 

To understand aspects of Eid-ul-Fitr

 

To understand Salum (fasting) and the reasons why people fast.

 

To explore the traditions surrounding Eid and the clothes, presents and cards given.

 

To explore Muslim artefacts and their purpose.

 

To understand the differences between Halal and Haram food

 

Christianity

 

To understand the significance of Advent

 

To understand the significance of Jesus birth

 

To understand Jesus as ‘Light of the world’

 

To explore the journey of Mary and Joseph, comparing and contrasting it to the birth of Princess Charlotte

Christianity

 

To think about their own beliefs and practices.

 

To understand that everyone is unique and special.

 

To understand that the bible teaches that God created everyone individually.

 

To explore how Christian teaching affects personal and social matters.

 

Islam

 

To explore aspects of Eid-ul-Adha.

 

To understand the story of Ibrahim’s sacrifice.

 

To discuss difficult choices and the consequences of our decisions.

 

To understand the traditions and practices surrounding Eid-ul-Adha.

 

To plan a set of instructions on preparing for Eid-ul-Adha.

 

Islam

 

To understand aspects of Muslim lifestyle and what makes Muslim lifestyle distinctive.

To understand the importance of the Mosque for Muslims.

 

To explore the layout and rituals associated with the Mosque.

 

Christianity

 

To explore the relevance of the symbol of the cross.

 

To understand why Easter eggs are used to celebrate Easter.

 

To understand the tradition of rolling eggs at Easter.

 

To understand that Jesus death had been foretold hundreds of years before.

 

To explore Jesus journey from the cross to the empty tomb.

 

To understand why the empty tomb was so shocking.

Christianity

 

To understand that Christians believe that Jesus is the Son of God and is referred to as Christ.

 

To understand that God also calls His people children of God.

 

To understand that the bible teaches about inheritance in heaven.

 

To explore the names for Jesus and develop an understanding of the word ‘Christ’

 

To understand how Jesus helped people.

 

To examine the story of Jesus healing the bleeding woman.

 

To explore the story of the raising of Lazarus

 

Islam

 

To examine the ways in which the Qur’an shapes Muslim lifestyles.

 

To explore the significance of the Qur’an.

 

 

Islam

 

To understand the importance of Muslim scripture, especially the Qur’an.

 

To introduce the Hadith and explore how it clarifies expectations.

 

To explore the creation story according to Islam.

 

To explore how a Muslim day of rest compares to days of rest of others.

 

To explore the story of Mohammed and the Spider.

 

Christianity

 

To explore some common characteristics of Christian practice which identifies groups as Christians.

Art/DT

 

Create Stone Age cave paintings

Develop a range of art and design techniques using a range of materials.

Painting

-Mix colours effectively.

-Use a number of brush

techniques using thick

and thin brushes to

produce shapes, textures,

patterns and lines.

 

Drawing

– Use different hardnesses

of pencils to show line,

tone.

 

-Use shading to show light and shadow and texture.

 

DT
Using naturally sourced materials to create a painting tool .

‘Lash’ sticks, feathers etc to another stick as our ‘handle’

 

 

Blast from the past bread

Recognise how eating different food groups creates a varied diet.

 

Follow a recipe, weighing out ingredients appropriately.

Food hygeine

Anglo Saxon coins

 

Sculpture

– Use clay and other

moldable materials.

 

– Add materials to provide

interesting detail.

 

 

 

Conservation bracelets – weaving

Keep cost constraints in mind when selecting materials in design

 

Use their knowledge of e.g. Science and Art when designing

 

Be aware of commercial aspects and incorporate these into their designs

 

Draw scaled diagrams with increasing use of ratio

 

Calculate the amount of materials needed, use this to estimate cost

 

Illustrations using watercolours

 

Drawing

– Use different hardnesses

of pencils to show line,

tone.

 

-Use shading to show light and shadow and texture.

 

Painting

-Mix colours effectively.

-Use a number of brush

techniques using thick

and thin brushes to

produce shapes, textures,

patterns and lines.

 

Make a car to travel on a rough surface

Draw scaled diagrams with increasing use of ratio

 

Calculate the amount of materials needed, use this to estimate cost

 

Design including hydraulics and pneumatics when/where appropriate

Show process of mummification by mummifying an orange – DT

Make a tomb – paper mache

Measure and cut out in precise detail and make sure that finished products are carefully finished

 

Make separate elements of a model before combining into the finished article

 

Hyroglyphics

Begin to look at and emulate the work of either artists, architects or designers in history.

 

Create original pieces

that are influenced by

studies of others.

Illustrations with artist pencils in style of Secret Seven

 

Begin to develop more accurate control using a range of materials.

 

Begin to experiment with a range of art, craft and design techniques.

 

Continue to use sketch books to record observations.

 

Begin to review and evaluate your work.

Drawing

– Use different hardnesses

of pencils to show line,

tone.

 

-Use shading to show light and shadow and texture.

 

Music  

Year 3 will have a specialist teaching music provision throughout the year.

 

Play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and play musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression

Improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the interrelated dimensions of music

Listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory

Use and understand staff and other musical notations

 

 

Personal, Social and Emotional Development SEAL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Health and Wellbeing

To know what positively and negatively affects their physical, mental and emotional health (including the media).

How to make informed choices (including recognising that choices can have positive, neutral and negative consequences) and to begin to understand the concept of a ‘balanced lifestyle’. (SEAL)

To recognise opportunities to make their own choices about food, what might influence their choices and the benefits of eating a balanced diet.

To recognise how images in the media do not always reflect reality and can affect how people feel about themselves.

To realise the consequences of anti-social and aggressive behaviours such as bullying. (Living in the wider world).

 

Relationships

 

To reflect on and celebrate their achievements, identify their strengths, areas for improvement, set high aspirations and goals. (SEAL)

To recognise what constitutes a positive, healthy relationship and develop the skills to form and maintain positive and healthy relationships. (SEAL)

To recognise ways in which a relationship can be unhealthy and who to talk to if they need support. (SEAL)

To be aware of different types of relationship, including those between acquaintances, friends, relatives and families. (SEAL)

To be aware that their actions affect themselves and others. (SEAL).

Living in the wider world

 

To know why and how rules and laws that protect themselves and others are made and enforced, why different rules are needed in different situations and how to take part in making and changing rules.

 

To resolve differences by looking at alternatives, seeing and respecting others’ points of view, making decisions and explaining choices.

 

To appreciate the range of national, regional, religious and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom.

 

To think about the lives of people living in other places, and people with different values and customs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stories and Songs

●      Read aloud a familiar sentence.

●      Use increasingly accurate pronunciation.

●      Identify basic grammatical rules such as feminine and masculine words.

●      Use basic key vocabulary and build on this through listening, practice, trial, and error.

●      Work as a small group to perform a short spoken text.

 

 

 

 

 

 

French

 

 

 

In school

 

●      Recall simple phrases.

●      Understand simple classroom instructions.

●      Listen to simple phrases with growing understanding.

●      Respond to simple topic related questions with a simple answer.

●      Make lists and memorise information.

●      Write a short sentence about a topic using class resources.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All About Me

 

●      Use sounds to help to read written words.

●      Name and label articles. (label the parts of body)

●      Read aloud a familiar sentence.

●      Acquire simple vocabulary for some verbs, not always in tense.

●      Label key vocabulary within text.

 

 

 

 

Download Year 3 Curriculum

YEAR 4 - 2018/19

Subject Autumn 1 Autumn 2 Spring 1 Spring 2 Summer 1 Summer 2
Core text/Theme The Empire Strikes Back Charlotte’s Web Incredible India Kensuke’s Kingdom Extreme Earth Operation Gadgetman
 

English

 

 

Ancient Greek Myths

Exploring a range of Ancient Greek myths to learn from their structure and explore the use of language.

 

Narrative: Writing our own myths

 

The Rotten Romans

Learning about the history of life in Ancient Rome and their rulers.

 

Non-fiction: Report writing about historical events.

 

Supporting texts

Ancient Greek Myths – Adam Bushnell

Who Let the Gods Out – Maz Evans

Charlotte’s Web

Discussion of characters and understanding their interactions in a story. Building cross-curricular links with Science topics.

 

Narrative: Play scripts

Non-fiction: Explanation texts about the life cycle of animals.

 

Core text

Discussing texts from around the globe and their style of writing, drawing on information from their country and culture.

 

Narrative: Writing a mystery story with influence from other cultures

 

Indian Culture

Understanding another culture and important figures.

 

Non-fiction: Biography of a prominent Indian figure

 

Supporting texts

● Seasons of Splendour

 

Kensuke’s Kingdom

Exploring how settings can help to structure a story and create atmosphere. Building cross-curricular links with Geography.

 

Narrative: Diary entry writing through The Stranded Project.

 

Poetry: Haiku poetry

 

Non-fiction: Instruction texts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extreme Places

Researching extreme places from around the globe and building an understanding of human and physical characteristics.

 

Non-fiction: Explanation text about Mount Everest

 

Extreme Weather

Understand the effects of extreme weather on Earth.

 

Narrative: Story writing using a book as a stimulus to develop our own ideas.

 

Non-fiction: Newspaper report writing about an extreme weather event.

 

Supporting texts

● Flood

 

Operation Gadgetman

Understanding of the invention of technology has impacted our lives and the implications of this.

 

Narrative: Play scripts of a character discovering a new machine.

 

Non-fiction: Biography of Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web

 

Poetry: Creative writing

Maths Number – Place Value

Count in multiples of 6,7,9,25 and 1000

Find 1000 more or less of a given number

Count backwards through 0 to include negative numbers

Recognise the place value of each digit of a four digit number (1000. 100. 10, 1)

Order and compare numbers beyond 1000

Identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations

 Round any number to the nearest 10, 100 or 1000

Solve number and practical problems that involve all of the above and with increasingly large positive numbers

Read Roman numerals 100 (I – C) and know that over time the numeral system changed to include the concept of 0 and place value

 

Number – Addition and Subtraction

Add and subtract numbers with up to 4 digits using the formal written methods of column addition and subtraction where appropriate

Estimate and use inverse operations to check answers to a calculation

Solve addition and subtraction 2 step problems in contexts deciding which operations and methods to use and why

Number – Multiplication and Division

Recall and use multiplication and division facts for multiplication tables up to 12 x 12

Use place value, known and derived facts to multiply and divide mentally, including: multiplying by 0 and 1, dividing by 1, multiplying together three numbers

Recognise and use factor pairs and commutatively in mental calculations

Multiply 2 digit and 3 digit numbers by a 1 digit number using formal written layout

Solve problem involving multiplying and adding, including using the distributive law to multiply two numbers by 1 digit, integer scaling problems and harder correspondence problems such as N objects are connected to M objects

 

Measurement – Perimeter and Length

Covert between different units of measure e.g. kilometre to metre

Measure and calculate the perimeter of a rectilinear figure (including squares) in centimetres and metres

 

Measurement – Area

Find the area of rectilinear shapes by counting squares

 

Fractions

Recognise and show using diagrams families of common equivalent fractions

Count up and down in hundredths; recognise that hundredths arise when dividing an object by 100 and dividing tenths by 10

Solve problems involving increasingly harder fractions to calculate quantities and fractions to divide quantities including non-unit fractions where the answer is a whole number

Add and subtract fractions with the same denominator

 

 

 

Decimals

Recognise and write decimal equivalents of any number of tenths or hundredths

Recognise and write decimal equivalents to 1/4 , 1/2 , 3/4

Find the effect of dividing a 1 or 2 digit number by 10 or 100, identifying the value of the digits in the answer as ones, tenths and hundredths

Round decimals with one decimal place to the nearest whole number

Compare numbers with the same number of decimal places up to two decimal places

 

 

Measurement – Money

Solve simple measure and money problems involving fractions and decimals to two decimal places

Estimate, compare and calculate different measures, including money in pounds and pence

 

Statistics

Interpret and present discrete and continuous data using appropriate graphical methods, including bar charts and time graphs.

Solve comparison, sum and difference problems using information presented in bar charts, pictograms, tables and other graphs.

 

Geometry – Angles

Identify acute and obtuse angles and compare and order angles up to two right angles by size.

 

Geometry – Shape and symmetry

Compare and classify geometric shapes, including quadrilaterals and triangles, based on their properties and sizes.Identify lines of symmetry in 2D shapes presented in different orientations.

 

Complete a simple symmetric figure with respect to a specific line of symmetry.

 

Geometry – Position and Direction

Describe positions on a 2D grid as coordinates in the first quadrant.

Describe movements between positions as translations of a given unit to the left/right and up/down.

Plot specified points and draw sides to complete a given polygon.

 

Time

Convert between different units of measure e.g. hour to minute

Read, write and convert time between analogue and digital, twelve and twenty four hour clock

Solve problems involving converting from hours to minutes, minutes to seconds, years to months, days to weeks

 

 

Science

 

Electricity

Identify common appliances that run on electricity

Construct a simple series electrical circuit, identifying and naming its basic parts, including cells, wires, bulbs, switches and buzzers

Identify whether or not a lamp will light in a simple series circuit, based on whether or not the lamp is part of a complete loop with a battery Recognise that a switch opens and closes a circuit and associate this with whether or not a lamp lights in a simple series circuit Recognise some common conductors and insulators, and associate metals with being good conductors.

Animals including Humans

Describe the simple functions of the basic parts of the digestive system in humans

Identify the different types of teeth in humans and their simple functions

Construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey.

Living things and their habitats

Recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways

Explore and use classification keys to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environment

Recognise that environments can change and that this can sometimes pose dangers to living things.

Sound

Identify how sounds are made, associating some of them with something vibrating

Recognise that vibrations from sounds travel through a medium to the ear

Find patterns between the pitch of a sound and features of the object that produced it

Find patterns between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it

Recognise that sounds get fainter as the distance from the sound source increases.

 

States of Matter

Compare and group materials together, according to whether they are solids, liquids or gases

Observe that some materials change state when they are heated or cooled, and measure or research the temperature at which this happens in degrees Celsius (°C)

Identify the part played by evaporation and condensation in the water cycle and associate the rate of evaporation with temperature.

Computing Digital Literacy

Understand what is cyberbullying

 

Understand how to keep themselves safe online and how to report concerns

Computer Science

Write instructions for a sprite to follow in Scratch

 

Use conditional statements (if … then) within an animation

 

Use repeat events in programs

 

Make improvements to make an animation more exciting

Information Technology

Plan, design and create and improve their own multimedia presentation (PowerPoint, Publishers, Word etc.) showing awareness of audience

Computer Science

Describe uses of technology and the impact of technology

 

Understand how stimulations and robots are used

 

History of computing timeline

Digital Literacy

Understand copyright and plagiarism

 

Explore what it means to be responsible and respectful online to become good digital citizens

Information Technology

Spreadsheets: choose, print and annotate appropriate graphs to answer simple questions e.g. bar charts, or pie charts and interpret data

PE Games

Tag Rugby

 

Swimming

Developing skills

Dance

Dances from popular culture

 

Swimming

Developing skills

Dance

Bollywood dancing

 

Gymnastics

Developing skills

Gymnastics

Developing skills

 

Games

Tennis

Athletics

Cricket and Rounders

 

Games

Hockey

Athletics

Catching, throwing and track events

 

Games

Badminton

 

History

 

How did the Roman Empire affect the world?

Finding out about the history of Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome and comparing that to modern day.

 

Distinguish between reliable and unreliable sources

Understand that some evidence is limited

Describe how some things from the past affect life today

Use a full range of date and historical terms

Use a timeline to place events, periods and cultural movements

Show changes on a timeline. Describe and make links between events and changes

Understand links between History and Geography

How has land use changed?

Understanding how land use has changed over time.

 

Know some similarities and differences within a period of time for examples the lives of rich and poor

Ask pertinent questions to explore possible answers

Choose from and use a range of documents and printed sources

Give reasons for change through analysing evidence

 

How has India changed from #-#?

Observing how the culture of India has differed from the UK across time.

 

Understand how economic development can change a place

Identify the parts of a river, and land use around and how these can change people’s lives

Know some similarities and differences within a period of time for examples the lives of rich and poor

Understand the relationships between beliefs and action in historical change

Understand links between History and Geography

Give reasons for change through analysing evidence

 

Exploring Japan as a country

To build understanding of the social, religious, political and cultural history of Japan.

 

Identify the most useful sources for a particular task

Understand differences in social, religious, political and cultural history

Understand differences in social, religious, political and cultural history

 

Weather Events in the USA

Researching major weather events from history.

 

Know the differences between weather and climate change

Give reasons for change through analysing evidence

Use graphs and charts to confirm information from different sources

Support own point of view using evidence

Ask pertinent questions to explore possible answers

Understand links between History and Geography

 

How have inventions changed through time?

Finding out about the history of inventions, including the World Wide Web.

 

Choose from and use a range of documents and printed sources

Use a timeline to place events, periods and cultural movements

 

Geography Ancient vs Modern Greece

Reading local maps and creating our own maps of local areas.

 

Draw maps of local places, including sketches from field work

Describe key aspects of: human geography including settlements and land use

Name and locate the countries of Europe and identify their main physical and human characteristics

 

 

 

Farmland in the UK and around the globe

Understanding the differences between types of land use in the UK.

 

Understand the different uses of different places

Understand and use the concept of links between physical and human features

 

India in the Modern World

Observing how the landscape of India has differed from the UK across time.

 

Compare collected data with information from the internet to discuss weather and climate

Use the eight points of a compass, four-figure grid references, symbols and keys to communicate knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.

Work out a location using a range of information

Islands in the Pacific

Identifying islands in the Pacific Ocean and exploring their human and physical characteristics.

 

Plan detailed routes using four points of the compass

Compare information from atlases with that from a globe

Describe key aspects of: physical geography, including: rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes and the water cycle

Find the longest and shortest routes using maps

 

United Kingdom vs United States

Collect temperature and rainfall using a range of instruments

Take field measurements over time

Compare collected data with information from the internet to discuss weather and climate

Begin to use the computer to draw graphs

Make detailed and labelled field sketches

Describe key aspects of: physical geography, including: rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes and the water cycle; human geography including settlements and land use

Use the eight points of a compass, four-figure grid references, symbols and keys to communicate knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.

Compare information from atlases with that from a globe

Name and locate counties and cities within the UK and locate using a map.

Begin to recognise position of the equator, Northern and Southern hemispheres and the Arctic and Antarctic circles

Identify the parts of a river, and land use around and how these can change people’s lives

 

RE Christianity

To understand the term, Holy Spirit

To understand that the Holy Spirit is living and active in people’s lives – The story of Nicodemus

To explore how the Holy Spirit came at Pentecost

To examine the reformation and how the Holy Spirit opened the eyes of Martin Luther

To examine a modern day example of someone who has experienced the transformation of the Holy Spirit in their lives.

To compare and contrast the lives of two people, one with and one without the Holy Spirit.

Hinduism

To understand why festivals are celebrated.

To introduce the idea of the Diwali festival.

To explore a typical Diwali for a Hindu

To explore the Sanskrit alphabet

To explore the Madir (Hindu temple)

 

Christianity

To understand aspects of the festival of Christmas.

To understand who the Magi were and their significance.

To compare and contrast King Herold with King Jesus.

To explore the consequences of Herold’s jealousy – Mary and Joseph’s flit to Egypt

To understand that Jesus was a gift to the world.

To understand the circumstances of Jesus birth and its significance.

Christianity

To understand that the beliefs and practices of Christians are shaped by their love for God.

To understand how Christians can know that God is real.

To explore how faith in God should have an outworking in a Christian’s life – The Fruits of the Spirit.

To examine the bible’s teaching on love

To understand the meaning of the term ‘saint’

To explore the life and work of Saint Cuthbert

 

Hinduism

To learn about aspects of Hindu lifestyle and what makes Hindu lifestyle distinctive.

To examine a day in the life of a Hindu child.

To examine a number of Hindu artefacts and research their purpose

To explore a number of Hindu festivals and examine what takes place.

 

Hinduism

To learn about aspects of the Holi festival.

To compare and contrast Holi with Chinese New Year

 

Christianity

To learn about aspects of Easter.

To explore what a king should look like and compare with Jesus

To explore the last supper and discuss how it compares to communion today.

To examine the religious leader’s views about Jesus

To examine the question ‘did Jesus really rise from the dead?’

 

Hinduism

To understand the importance of Hindu scriptures and their origin.

To understand the importance of the story of Rama and Sita for Hindus.

Hinduism

To understand the importance of community for Christians.

To compare and contrast the early church in Acts 2 with the modern day evangelical church (JPC)

To understand the significance of ‘home group’ to Christians and how that helps to build Christian community.

Hinduism

To understand the importance of the creation story for Hindus.

To understand the role of different gods and goddesses in the Hindu religion.

To understand the affect Jesus had on those he met.

To understand the affect Jesus had on his disciples –The Calling of the twelve disciples.

To compare and contrast the transformation meeting Jesus had on Zacchaeus in the bible and a modern day example – (Billy Graham website)

To explore the concept of the Great Commission and examine the lives of the disciples after Jesus returned to heaven.

Art/DT

 

Ancient Greek Art

Creating vases in the style of the famous Greek artist Andokides.

 

Begin to develop an understanding of the range of art, craft and design techniques used by artists/designers

 

Art – Great artists, architects and designers in history

Continue to develop an understanding of the work of either artists, architects or designers in history

 

Replicate some of the techniques used by notable artists, artisans and designers

 

DT – Design, Make & Evaluate

Use others to help generate ideas

 

Use what they know about the properties of materials

 

Plan work to include a range of joins

 

Ensure that plans are realistic and appropriate for the aim

 

Show the order of working in plans

 

Use models, pictures and words in designs

 

Use scoring and folding for precision

 

Work out how to make models stronger

 

Use what they know about the properties of materials

 

 Alter and adapt materials to make them stronger

 

Be clear about ideas when asked

 

Can alter and adapt original plans following discussion and evaluation

Farm Animals

 

Art – Develop techniques with creativity

 

Develop ideas from starting points throughout the curriculum

 

Adapt and refine ideas as they progress

 

Explore ideas in a variety of ways

 

DT – Nutrition

Understand seasonality, and know when and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed

 

Understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet

 

Understand safe food storage

 

Indian Influence

 

Art – Drawing, painting and sculpture

● Painting – use watercolour paint to produce washes for background then add detail, experiment with creating mood with colour

 

● Collage – select and arrange materials for striking effect, ensure work is precise, use coiling, overlapping, tessellation, mosaic and montage

 

DTCooking

Prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques

 

Begin to select their own ingredients when cooking or baking

 

Weigh in grams

 

Make good presentation of food

 

Japanese Art

 

Art – Develop techniques with creativity

Continue to develop control using a range of materials

 

Collect information, sketches and resources

 

Comment on artwork using visual language

 

DT – Design, Make & Evaluate

Recognise that designs must meet a range of needs

 

Apply what they know about mechanisms to create movement when planning and designing

 

Investigate a range of products to see how they work

 

Choose tools and equipment which are appropriate for the job

 

Prepare for work be assembling components together before joining

 

Make holes using a punch and drill

 

Combine a number of components together in different ways

 

Make finished products neat and tidy

 

Recognise what has gone well, but suggest further improvements for the finished article

 

Suggest which elements they would do better in the future

 

 

 

American Influence

 

Art – Drawing, painting and sculpture

● Sculpture  – create and combine shapes to create recognisable forms, include texture that conveys feelings, expression or movement

 

Drawing – annotate sketches to explain and elaborate ideas, sketch lightly, use hatching and cross hatching to show tone and texture

 

DT – Cooking and Nutrition

 

 

ArtGreat artists, architects and designers in history

Continue to develop an understanding of the work of either artists, architects or designers in history

 

Replicate some of the techniques used by notable artists, artisans and designers

 

 

DT – Design and Evaluate

Make increasing use of ICT to plan ideas

 

Say why something will be useful

 

Identify where evaluation has led to improvement

 

Music Traditional Greek Music

-Lead a group when performing.

Compose simple tunes using a pentatonic scale.

Use repeated pattens for effect.

Follow instructions from symbols when singing or playing.

Know and use simple standard notation of pitch and beat.

Give reasons for opinions about music from the past.

 

Sing with me

Sing in tune and with expression. –

Hold their own part when performing by ear or by notation.

Begin to sing in two part harmony. –

Show control through breathing, articulation and dynamic.

Take part in two-part harmonies.

Understand the relationship between lyrics and melody.

Note key features of the work of a given composer.

Bollywood

Create rhythmic patterns with an awareness of timbre and duration.

Appreciate harmonies, drones and ostinato.

Understand the cultural and social meaning of lyrics.

Understand culture in composition.

 

 

 

 

The sounds of the sea

Show increasing control with instruments.

Use change in pitch to express ideas.

Use specific vocabulary when explaining likes/dislikes about a piece of music.

Understand the concept of bass and treble clef.

 

 

 

 

Wild weather

Use a range of dynamics, timbre and pitch in composition.

Use emphasis and accent to create effects.

Use own signs and symbols to record composition.

Recognise differences in music naming a least one famous composer.

 

Machinery

Describe what they hear using a wider range of musical vocabulary.

Explore the way in which sounds are combined towards certain effects.

Recognise how musical elements are used by composers to create different moods and effects.

 

Personal, Social and Emotional Development SEAL Relationships

 

To judge what kind of physical contact is acceptable or unacceptable and how to respond.

To understand the concept of ‘keeping something confidential or secret’, when we should or should not agree to do this and when it is right to ‘break a confidence’ or ‘share a secret’.

To work collaboratively towards shared goals. (SEAL)

To develop strategies to resolve disputes and conflict through negotiation and appropriate compromise and to give rich and constructive feedback and support to benefit others as well as themselves. (SEAL)

Living in the Wider World

To research, discuss and debate topical issues, problems and events concerning health and wellbeing and offer their recommendations to appropriate people.

To know the role money plays in their own and others’ lives, including how to manage their money and about being a critical consumer.

To develop an understanding of ‘enterprise’ and the skills that make someone ‘enterprising’.

 

Health and Wellbeing

 

To deepen their understanding of good and not so good feelings, to extend their vocabulary to enable them to explain both the range and intensity of their feelings. (SEAL)

To differentiate between the terms ‘risk’, ‘danger’ and ‘hazard’. To deepen their understanding of risk by recognising, predicting and assessing risks in different situations and deciding how to manage them responsibly and how to use this as an opportunity to build resilience.

To recognise their increasing independence brings increased responsibility to keep themselves and others safe.

To know that bacteria and viruses can affect health and that following simple routines can reduce their spread.

 

French Les quatre amis (The four friends)

 

Listen beyond a level at which they can speak independently.

Tell the time in simple terms.

Articulate clearly.

Fill in a table of verbs.

Underline correct/ incorrect.

Identify simple errors.

Memorise and recall key words to use in writing.

Sequence sentences to form short narratives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On y va (All aboard)

 

Use accurate pronunciation.

Get meaning across, sometimes using phrases.

Discuss word meanings, linking to patterns in English and new language.

Use number to and beyond 100.

Check that simple text makes sense and discuss understanding of the meaning.

Identify key details from text even without full interpretation.

Use key vocabulary from a text to explain key points of a short text.

Begin to use a bilingual dictionary to look up new words.

 

 

 

 

 

 

La vie et la santé (Life & Health)

 

Use known phrases to ask and answer questions.

Create oral sentences independently.

Respond to simple classroom instructions.

Learn, memorise and perform a short spoken text.

Read aloud short rhymes and poems.

Write a short paragraph of 2 or 3 sentences using key topic vocabulary.

Begin to substitute words within written work as needed.

Uses grammatical knowledge to select correct form of word. E.g. feminine and masculine.

Download Year 4 Curriculum 2018-2019

YEAR 5 - SPRING TERM 2019

Subject Spring 1 Spring 2
Core text/Theme Amazing Astronomers

(Linked with Maya civilisation)

English Maya Myths- The Hero Twins- Dan Jolley

 

To increase familiarity with a wide range of books including myths, legends and traditional stories

To write a Maya based legend, identifying audience through selecting the appropriate form and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action.

 

 

Poetry: Chocolate themed poetry

 

To write a blank verse persuasive poem from the perspective of chocolate bar in first person.

 

To identify the relationship between free verse poetry, rap and freedom of speech through the media.

 

To study a variety of poetic styles including blackout poetry and produce a poem using themed texts.

Space Conspiracy Theories- Did the moon landing ever happen?

To write a balanced argument based on evidence and inference.

To include independent research to support arguments and provide equal weighting.

Planet Creation- To write a navigator’s guide to a new planet.

Cosmic- Frank Cottrell-Boyce

To recognise key features of sci-fi fiction.

To write a narrative based on a journey into space.

Maths  

Fractions

Recognise and show, using diagrams, families of common equivalent fractions.

Count up and down in hundredths; recognise that hundredths arise when dividing an object by one hundred and dividing tenths by ten.

Solve problems involving increasingly harder fractions to calculate quantities, and fractions to divide quantities, including non-unit fractions where the answer is a whole number.

Add and subtract fractions with the same denominator.

Multiply fractions by a whole number

 

Decimals

Recognise and write decimal equivalents of any number of tenths or hundredths.

Recognise and write decimal equivalents to 1 4 , 1 2 , 3 4

Find the effect of dividing a one or two digit number by 10 or 100, identifying the value of the digits in the answer as ones, tenths and hundredths.

Round decimals with one decimal place to the nearest whole number.

Compare numbers with the same number of decimal places up to two decimal places

 

 

Percentages

Recognise the percent symbol (%) and understand that per cent relates to “number of parts per 100”, and write percentages as a fraction with denominator 100, and as a decimal fraction

Solve problems which require knowing percentage and decimal equivalents of 1/2, 1/4, 1/5, 2/5, 4/5 and fractions with a denominator of a multiple of 10 or 25.

 

Science

 

Living things and habitats

Describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibian, an insect and a bird

Describe the life process of reproduction in some plants and animal

Earth and space

Describe the movement of the Earth and other planets relative to the sun in the solar system

Describe the movement of the moon relative to the Earth

Describe the sun, Earth and moon as approximately spherical bodies

Use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky

Computing Digital Literacy

 

Use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/ unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.

 

To identify how fake news can be created and understand that we should be discerning in evaluating digital content.

 

Explore Google Digital Heroes and Google Interland to understand a range of online risks

Computer Science

 

Design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts.

Use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output.

PE Dance

 

Perform dance actions with control and expression.

 

Choose their own dance steps and movements and then develop them into a routine.

 

Perform longer routines from memory adding expression and extension to their movements.

 

To choreograph short routines to portray a particular mood or style.

 

To explore different styles of dance and develop short routines in a those styles.

Invasion Games

 

To select the most appropriate person to pass to within a game and the most appropriate style of pass to ensure accuracy.

 

To dribble a ball in different directions and avoid obstacles. e.g. With their feet or a hockey stick.

 

To help other members of his/her team to find space within a team game.

 

To evaluate his/her own and the teams performance within a challenge and make suggestions of how to improve for next time.

 

To use effective communication and teamwork within games.

Orienteering

 

To plan a simple orienteering trial for others to complete. e.g. Using the local area.

 

To read a wide variety of map symbols and use a compass when following a given route.

 

To plan ideas of how to solve a problem before attempting it.

 

To decide if verbal or non-verbal communication is the most effective choice when solving problems.

 

To take the lead within a group challenge and give clear instructions to others.

 

To evaluate his/her own and the teams performance within a challenge and make suggestions of how to improve for next time.

Gymnastics

 

To perform actions in and out of rolls.

 

To lead others in a stretching routine to prepare for gymnastics.

 

To perform a range of balances with a high level of control and accuracy.

 

To hold different positions when balancing and use different shapes to express a given theme/mood.

 

To create sequences that have changes of speed and level.

 

To select the most appropriate ways to travel from one balance to another.

 

History

 

Mayan Civilisation
A contrasting study of a non-European society: Mayan civilization c. AD900-To consider how archaeologists know about the Maya period and evaluate how technology has helped in discovering more about the past.-To recognise how Maya civilisations and laws were influenced by their belief systems surrounding faith, space and advances in knowledge
Geography Mexico and Central America

(Linked with Maya civilisation study)

– locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe (including the location of Russia) and North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities

– identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night)

– understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region within North or South America

– describe and understand key aspects of human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water

– use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied

RE
Art/DT

 

 

Mayan Art

 

-Create painted blackout poetry linked with chocolate creation.

-DT: Create Mayan masks and pottery

A Study of Space

 

-Create a solar system with papier mache.

-Accurately use a range of materials.

-Study representation of space and use a variety of techniques to create a new planetary landscape

-Sketch (lightly) before painting to combine line and colour.

Create a colour palette based

upon colours

Use brush techniques and the qualities of paint to create texture.

 

Music

 

Google Music Lab/Garageband digital composition

 

-Recognise how different musical elements are combined expressively in many different types of music.

 

-Combine several layers of sound with awareness of combined effect.

 

 

Soundscape of Space

 

Gustav Holst- The Planet Suite

-Begin to identify the work of a small number of named composers.

 

– Briefly explain the impact of a composer on a given time period.

 

-Consider differences in music from a given period and the modern day.

Living in the Wider World

Link with ICT – Fake News

To recognise and understand the reasons why the media may present information in different ways.

To understand that the internet and social media may not always portray the truth.

To recognise the difference between a trustworthy news source and an untrustworthy news source.

To understand how to find reliable information online and in the media.

To understand the need to respect the differing ideas of a range of people in society.

Sex and Relationships Education

School Nurse Specialist Teaching Provision

MFL Specialist teaching provision-

Begin to understand and use simple grammatical features – e.g. tense.

– Memorise key words and phrases from books, building vocabulary.

– Draw on background understanding of vocabulary and grammar when listening.

– Use language in drama and role play, and experiment with new vocabulary.

– Speak audibly with increasing fluency.

– Demonstrate understanding through verbalisation, linking new meanings to known vocabulary.

– Use increasingly correct vocabulary and terminology.

– Listen and respond to each other and to adults.

– Tell the time in more complex terms.

– Ask questions to extend understanding.

– Explain ideas and concepts, showing understanding and comprehension.

Download Year 5 Curriculum

YEAR 6 - SPRING TERM 2019

Subject Spring 1 Spring 2
Core text/Theme Secrets of the Deep
 

English

 

 

Fiction Friday

 

Tales of Terror from the Black Ship

Focus on KS2 reading domains through whole class reciprocal reading:

•give/explain the meaning of words in context

– retrieve and record information/identify key details from fiction and non-fiction

– summarise main ideas from more than one paragraph

– make inferences from the text/explain and justify inferences with evidence from the text

– predict what might happen from details stated and implied

– identify/explain how information/narrative content is related and contributes to

meaning as a whole

– identify/explain how meaning is enhanced through choice of words and phrases

– make comparisons within the text

 

 

Titanic

To make notes to plan own information guide

To write information guide

To write to Persuade -”The Unsinkable Titanic”

To write a narrative – Shipwrecked.

 

Sea creatures

To write a non-chronological report-sea creatures

Newspaper article- sea creature is missing.

 

 

Fiction Friday

 

Tales of Terror from the Black Ship

Focus on KS2 reading domains through whole class reciprocal reading:

•give/explain the meaning of words in context

– retrieve and record information/identify key details from fiction and non-fiction

– summarise main ideas from more than one paragraph

– make inferences from the text/explain and justify inferences with evidence from the text

– predict what might happen from details stated and implied

– identify/explain how information/narrative content is related and contributes to

meaning as a whole

– identify/explain how meaning is enhanced through choice of words and phrases

– make comparisons within the text

 

Explorers

To write a biography about a famous explorer

To write a diary set on a famous explorer’s expedition

 

Kipling -How to Stories

To write own narrative in the style of Kipling

 

Pollution

To write a journalistic report on plastic pollution

 

 

Maths Decimals

Identify the value of each digit in numbers given to 3 decimal places and multiply numbers by 10, 100 and 1,000 giving answers up to 3 decimal places.

Multiply one-digit numbers with up to 2 decimal places by whole numbers.

Use written division methods in cases where the answer has up to 2 decimal places.

Solve problems which require answers to be rounded to specified degrees of accuracy.

 

 

Percentages

 

Solve problems involving the calculation of percentages [for

example, of measures and such as 15% of 360] and the use of percentages for comparison.

 

Recall and use equivalences between simple fractions, decimals and percentages including in different contexts.

 

 

Algebra

 

Use simple formulae.

 

Generate and describe linear number sequences.

 

Express missing number problems algebraically.

 

Find pairs of numbers that satisfy an equation with two unknowns.

 

Enumerate possibilities of combinations of two variables.

 

 

Converting units

 

Solve problems involving the

calculation and conversion of units of measure, using decimal notation up to three decimal places where appropriate.

 

Use, read, write and convert between standard units, converting measurements of length, mass, volume and time from a smaller unit of measure to a larger unit, and vice versa, using decimal notation to up to 3dp.

 

Convert between miles and

kilometres.

 

Perimeter, area and volume

 

Recognise that shapes with the same areas can have different perimeters and vice versa.

 

Recognise when it is possible to use formulae for area and volume of shapes.

 

Calculate the area of parallelograms and triangles.

 

Calculate, estimate and compare volume of cubes and cuboids using standard units, including cm3, m3 and extending to other units (mm3, km3)

 

Science

 

Biology: Living Things and their habitats

–       describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences, including micro-organisms, plants and animals

 

–       give reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics.

Biology: Evolution and inheritance

–  recognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago

 

–  recognise that living things produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents

 

–  identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution.

 

 

Computing

Information technology

–       to identify a problem which can be solved by collecting data

–       to identify which data to collect

–       to collect data in an efficient and accurate way

–       to organise data by designing fields and records in a database

–       to interpret data by using a range of searches and graphs

–       to draw conclusions from data

–       to use conclusions to solve the original problem

–       to present findings to a specified audience

–       to justify reasons for their choices and explain why other methods were not appropriate

–        Simulation

–       ·         To identify and enter the correct formulae into cells, modify the data, make predictions of changes and check them

–       ·         to identify formulae and enter them into a spreadsheet

–       ·         Copy formulae to create tables of results

–       ·         to use a spreadsheet to draw a graphs and answer questions

–       to change the data and formulae in a spreadsheet to answer ‘what if …?’ questions and check predictions

Communication and collaboration

–  to understand how podcasts can used to share information

–  to write a produce a topic linked podcast

–  to use software to record a podcast

PE  

 

Specialist teaching provision: NUFC foundation

 

 

 

History

 

 

Oceans: shipwrecks

–       make links between events and changes; giving reasons for them and explaining the result.

–       suggest reasons for conflicting historical accounts.

–       analyse sources of information for his/her accuracy, usefulness and relevance and combines them to answer questions.

Evolution: historical studies

–       make links between events and changes; giving reasons for them and explaining the result.

–       suggest reasons for conflicting historical accounts.

–       analyse sources of information for his/her accuracy, usefulness and relevance and combines them to answer questions.

Geography Oceans: physical geography

–       make his/her own simple thematic map based on his/her own data.

–       use photographs and standard and non-standard measurements to create an accurate map of an area.

–       locate the world’s continents/countries including North and South America identifying key human and physical characteristics, countries and major cities.

–       locate the position of the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, the Greenwich Meridian and times zones.

–       locate places on an OS map using a 6 figure grid reference

–       use longitude and latitude as a guide to a location on an atlas.

–       make his/her own simple thematic map based on his/her own data.

–       use photographs and standard and non-standard measurements to create an accurate map of an area.

–       locate the world’s continents/countries including North and South America identifying key human and physical characteristics, countries and major cities.

–       locate the position of the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, the Greenwich Meridian and times zones.

–       locate places on an OS map using a 6 figure grid reference

–       use longitude and latitude as a guide to a location on an atlas.

Oceans: human geography

–       explore and explain topical geographical issues in his/her places of study and understand how these issues have cha                nged over time.make a scale drawing using scales based around the power of 10.

–       use photographs and standard and non-standard measurements to create an accurate map of an area.

–       understand how human and physical features in places in the UK have changed over time.

–       describe and understand economic activity and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

RE Hinduism

Worship and Communities

Learn about Hindu worship in the mandir and the home

 

God and other beliefs

To learn that Hindus have one God but God has many faces.

 

Hinduism

Origins/Leaders

Learn about important events in Hindu and Indian history

 

Art/DT

 

 

Art

Susannah Ayre – local artist and printmaker

Explain with reasoning the choices of an artist/designer to explain the intended effect of different craft and design techniques – printing and mixed media textured artwork (local coastal artists).

-Combine visual and tactile qualities.

 

Painting and drawing

Use the qualities of watercolour and acrylic paints to create visually interesting pieces – seascapes inspired by famous artists.

-Choose a style of drawing suitable for the work (e.g. realistic or impressionist)

–       With pastel/charcoal, he/she can use blending and overlaying colours to create soft backgrounds, using fingers to smudge.

–       use pens to record minute detail.

–       create different effects e.g. wet paint to create a watercolour; texture by adding PVA or sawdust; using brushes in different ways with thickened paint.

 

Sculpture

Show life-like qualities and real life proportions or, if more abstract, provoke different interpretations – clay sculptures inspired by the oceans.

–       add detail to a clay sculpture using clay tools or to a 3D sculpture using different materials

Design Technology

Sewing – ocean themed miniature cushions

 

Food technology – The Tinned Fish Challenge.

To create a meal based around tinned fish, evaluating design.

–       design products that are innovative and appeal to individuals or groups.

–       create an exploded diagram of his/her design.

–       select the appropriate tools to follow a given recipe to make a savoury dish.

–       estimate amount of ingredients to an appropriate level of accuracy.

–       collect feedback from others to find out how to improve his/her product.

–       evaluate existing products in relation to their purpose and audience.

Music

 

 

Storm’ from Peter Grimes – Benjamin Britten

 

Recognise fluidity within music and how musical elements flow during transition within a piece.

 

Explain the effects of each layering of sound within a piece of music.

 

Develop aural skills, explaining how musical elements are used in certain moods / genres of music.

 

Identify and explore the relationship between sounds.

 

Convey intentions through compositions.

 

Use a wide range of musical devices such as melody, rhythm, chords and structures.

Personal, Social and Emotional Development SEAL Mental health issues – body image and eating disorders.

Political issues – issues in the news including plastic pollution and G8 environmental priorities.

French Specialist teaching provision-

-Read about a given topic, with simple interpretations.

– Retrieve and record information.

– Paraphrase and summarise information in the new language.

 

– Write explanations and concepts.

– Summarise information in their own writing.

– Apply new phrases from reading to previous vocabulary and grammar.

Download Year 6 Curriculum

STATEMENT ON BRITISH VALUES

Ponteland First  School is committed to serving its community and surrounding areas. It recognises the multi cultural, multi faith and ever-evolving  nature of the United Kingdom and therefore those it serves. It also understands the vital role it has in ensuring that groups or individuals within the school are not subjected to intimidation or radicalisation by those wishing to unduly, or illegally, influence them.

Our  school accepts and welcomes  admissions from all those entitled to an education under British law, including pupils of all faiths or none. It follows the policies outlined by its governing body regarding equal opportunities, which guarantee that there will be no discrimination against any individual or group, regardless of faith, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, political or financial status, or similar. It seeks to serve all.

The Government emphasises that schools are required to ensure that key ‘British Values’ are taught in all UK schools. The government set out its definition of British values in the ‘Prevent Strategy’ – values of:

• democracy

• the rule of law

• individual liberty

• mutual respect

• tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs

Should you feel that the school is not meeting this requirement, you should contact the school office and request to express your concerns to the Head Teacher. Likewise, if you feel that anyone working at the school is intentionally or otherwise undermining these values, you should report this to the Head Teacher.

Our  school does, through a wide range of activities, secure such standards and uses strategies within the National Curriculum and beyond to secure such outcomes for children. The list below outlines samples of when and where such British Values are shared. The list is not exhaustive, and represents only some of what we do.

Subject studies: Developing the skill base required to access/share information, make/express decisions and apply themselves to society and the world. These include the understanding and use of money, effective writing and reading skills, collaborative work, to discuss and research ideas and concepts, and gain a broad and balanced understanding of the society in which the children live. Aspects of study beyond core skills include historical and geographical context of the United Kingdom, incorporating local and national evolution, as well as international comparisons.

Whole school daily acts of collective worship/assembly: The sharing of stories, images, events, music and expectations that, with clarity and precision, promote the values expressed. Such proceedings vary in the methodology of delivery in order to secure interest and understanding and are designed to impact on children regardless of knowledge, experience or  maturity. As a ‘community school’, ‘collective worship’ is non-denominational and recognising and acknowledging that those attending may have a wide range of faiths, or none. It is however, in line with regulation and is “wholly or mainly of a broadly Christian character”.

Religious Education: Gaining a greater understanding of religious diversity and practices, which covers key religions represented in the UK. Planning for the subject is directed by the ‘Standing Advisory Council on Religious Education (SACRE)– Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education’.

Physical Education: Promotion of the concept of ‘fair play’, following and developing rules, inclusion, celebrating and rewarding success and working together as part of a team.

School Council: Promotion of democratic processes, fostering the concept and application of freedom of speech and group action to address needs and concerns. Key to this is the concept of holding others to account, including those in positions of authority and influence.

 

L Blain

October 2014