CURRICULUM

Maths Week 2016 - Workbook

Time workbook to support Maths week.

Reading Scheme Information

Additional information on the reading scheme

Phonics Information

Additional information on phonics

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Additional information regarding the curriculum can be obtained from the class teacher in each year group.

NURSERY AUTUMN TERM 2018 2

Personal, Social and Emotional Development

We will welcome the children back after half term and support them to develop their growing friendships. This will give all the children an opportunity to respond to others and experience collaboration in play. Each child will be made to feel special and valued through our team activities. We will revisit Nursery rules so that all children are aware of how their actions and actions of others affect everyone.
We will continue updating the children’s Learning Journeys through our online system Tapestry and invite you to add any photographs at any time. This enables each child to spend time with us celebrating their achievements.

Communication and Language

The children will be encouraged to show an interest in what others are saying, especially at whole group carpet time and team time. Many activities are planned to develop listening and concentration skills. Through our topic, the children will have the opportunity to build vocabulary associated with new experiences and share their understanding and knowledge. We will welcome pictures of our animals for us to discuss together.

 

Literacy

Our early phonics activities will encourage the children to tune into sounds, listen and remember sounds and talk about sounds. We will continue to develop “Phase 1 of Letters and Sounds” used throughout the school Nursery to Year 4.

Through reading lots of stories, the children will become aware of different characters in books. They will begin to understand that stories have a beginning, middle and end.

All mark making will be valued and encouraged.

Physical Development

The children have daily opportunities for outdoor play where they have space to run and play. The equipment allows them to climb and mount steps using alternate feet. They are able to judge distances, negotiate space and start and stop whether chasing each other or riding bikes. Tyres and blocks enable the children to create structures with large items.

The CD player is always available, giving the children opportunities to create their own body shapes and respond to what they hear with imagination.

The cut and stick table allows development of fine motor skills through use of scissors, the mark making table through pencil use and Funky Fingers activities requires hand/eye coordination. We will introduce the children to lots of Funky Finger activities to build up writing skills.

We will look at the importance of washing our hands and hygiene.

Starting Interest – The changing seasons, weather, Halloween, Bonfire Night.
Stimulus – The environment – indoors and outdoors, Shops, Singing, Music Making, Celebrating Christmas.
Understanding the World

As Autumn continues, the children will be able to experience seasonal change. Our weekly visits to the woods will begin to reinforce seasonal change – bare trees, an icy pond and changing colours of leaves,

We will spend the first days talking about the Autumn half term break, when the children will realise that not everyone has spent it in the same way. Children will share their experiences during their special group times with their key person.

The children will also be learning about and celebrating Bonfire night, Diwali and Christmas. We are busy leaning songs ready for our Christmas celebrations!

Following the children’s interests in shops, our new topic will be ‘Waitrose’. We will be looking at healthy eating, use of plastic and the importance of recycling.

 

Mathematics

We will continue to practise reciting numbers in order to 10. The children will be asked to represent numbers using their fingers and be made aware that numbers can be made in more than one way. Through our Waitrose topic we will count different items that you might find in a shop.

Our topic work through stories and the seasons will give opportunities to use language such as ‘big’ and ‘little’, and ‘long’ and ‘short’. It will reinforce colour naming, sorting and counting.

2D and 3D shapes are always available, allowing the children to show an interest in shape by making arrangements and patterns.

The children will become aware of the importance of knowing the time through snack time, tidy up time and home time.

Expressive Arts and Design

The paints are always available to allow the children to explore colour, how it can be mixed and changed. (They are also learning how to control their hand movements in preparation for handwriting!)

The home corner is always popular allowing children to recreate experiences from home.

The musical instruments are always available to allow the children to experiment with sound. We will be exploring loud and quiet sounds, high and low sounds. The children will become aware that music has rhythm and will be given opportunities to recreate simple rhythmical patterns and make up their own and we will move our bodies in response to sounds and music.

 

RECEPTION AUTUMN TERM 2018 1

This half term we concentrate on ensuring that all the children are happy, settled and feel safe. We stagger the children in during the first three weeks to allow them to get to know us, their classmates and the school.

Once all the children are in school we will start introducing activities based on the topic ‘Ourselves’.

In Personal, Social and Emotional Development we focus on self- help skills, developing the children’s independence, establishing rules and routines within the class and supporting the children in managing their feelings and emotions.

In Communication and Language we encourage the children to develop confidence in speaking in small and larger groups. We will read lots of stories and the children will be invited to retell them in their own words and think of alternative endings.

In Physical Development the children will have daily access to the outdoor environment where they can develop their gross motor skills. We will go to the woods on Forest Fridays so that as well as learning about the natural environment the children will have space to run, climb and explore. Fine motor skills will be developed through Funky Finger activities.

In Mathematics the children will be confidently counting up to ten and then counting out objects with 1:1 correspondence. They will have access to games on the interactive whiteboard to develop their number recognition.

In Literacy the children will be encouraged to write with emphasis on correct letter formation. They will be taught cursive script from the start. Whole class daily phonics sessions will begin when the children will learn letter sounds and names, to blend and to segment simple words. Reading books and word wallets will be issued after half term.

In Understanding the World the children will develop an understanding that we all have similarities and differences that make us unique. An awareness and respect for different cultures will be encouraged as we celebrate Harvest and learn from each other.

In Expressive Arts and Design the children will have opportunities to engage in role play and small world play. They will have access to playdough, paint, musical instruments and chalk. They will explore music and movement in some PE sessions and learn new songs in preparation for Harvest.

Please ensure your child brings wellies every Friday and has covered legs. Our woodland area is kept natural and we educate the children on plants, including nettles, rather than removing them.

Fruit is provided by the government but we ask for a voluntary 50p weekly contribution so that we can offer a more varied choice. Any extra money is used to finance cooking activities or to buy extra resources for the classroom.

The children love to create using junk materials (boxes etc that you would recycle) so please bring in any that you have.

Download Reception Curriculum

YEAR 1 AUTUMN TERM 2018

Subject Autumn 1 Autumn 2
Core text/Theme Enchanted Kingdom Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
 

English

 

 

Fairytale Stories– Jack and the Beanstalk Carousel

Stories with patterned language– Jack and the Bean Stalk Carousel

Instructions – How to grow a bean stalk

Poetry, rhyme and pattern – The Gingerbread Man, The Three Little Pigs

 

Supporting texts

Jack and the Beanstalk

The Gingerbread Man

The Three Little Pigs

 

 

Fairytale Stories- Snow White carousel

Recounts- Snow white/ witch/ dwarfs point of view

Poetry: Using the senses – Poetry linked to cooking

Non- Chronological Report – Christmas booklet / Halloween

Lists and Captions – Christmas List/ captions for Christmas Photos

 

Supporting texts

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (and alternative versions)

Mog’s Christmas

Maths Place Value

Count to ten, forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, or from any given number. Count, read and write numbers to 10 in numerals and words. Identify and represent numbers using objects and pictorial representations including the number line, and use the language of: equal to, more than, less than (fewer), most, least. Given a number, identify one more or one less. Count in multiples of twos. Count to twenty, forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, from any given number. Count, read and write numbers from 1 to 20 in numerals and words. Identify and represent numbers using objects and pictorial representations including the number line, and use the language of: equal to, more than, less than (fewer), most, least. Count in multiples of twos and fives

 

Number: Addition and subtraction

Represent and use number bonds and related subtraction facts (within 10) Add and subtract one digit numbers (to 10), including zero. Read, write and interpret mathematical statements involving addition (+), subtraction (-) and equals (=) signs. Solve one step problems that involve addition and subtraction, using concrete objects and pictorial representations and missing number problems. Represent and use number bonds and related subtraction facts within 20. Add and subtract one digit and two digit numbers to 20, including zero. Read, write and interpret mathematical statements involving addition (+), subtraction (-) and equals (=) signs. Solve one step problems that involve addition and subtraction, using concrete objects and pictorial representations, and missing number problems such as 7= ? – 9

 

Geometry

Recognise and name common 2D and 3D shapes, including rectangles, squares, circles and triangles, cuboids, pyramids and spheres. Describe position, direction and movement, including whole, half, quarter and three quarter turns

Science

 

Animals including humans

·         Identify and name common animals and group them

·         Identify animals that are carnivores, omnivores and herbivores

·         Identify and compare the structure of animals i.e. fish, birds

·         Identify parts of the human body and say which parts of the body are associated with each sense

 

Everyday materials

·           distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made

·            identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass, metal, water, and rock

·            describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials

·          compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties.

Computing ·          recognise common uses of information technology beyond school

·          use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.

·           understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions

·          create and debug simple programs

·          use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.

·          Create Ozobot maps for Snow White to escape the evil queen

PE Gymnastics – Points and Patches

 

Gymnastics – bouncing, jumping and landing (apparatus)

 

 

Dance – Snow white and the Seven Dwarfs

 

 

 

 

History

 

What is a kingdom and who runs it now and has ran it in the past?

 

·          Identify old and new from pictures and artefacts.

 

·          Read stories about kings and queens of the past

 

·          Observe and handle artefacts from the past

 

 

·          Identify some similarities and differences between their own lives and those of people who lived in the past. (Modern day child’s life/ Victorian child)

 

·          Find out about significant kings and queens in the past

 

Find out why people such as Henry VIII acted as he did

Geography  

·          Create a plan to mark a known route. (Castles)

 

·          Identify where they have been on holiday using a map. (Holiday news)

 

·          Know the main aspects of the British Isles using maps.

 

·          Talk about places seen in books, videos, and internet.

 

·          Describe different types of buildings. (Castles/ homes)

·          Know that places are linked by paths or roads.

 

·          Draw simple plans and maps of a known area/made up place and talk about them.

 

RE ·          That Christians think of God as creator

·          To examine what we have to be thankful for.

·          To discuss how and why we should care for the planet.

·          To understand the creation story.

·          To use poetry to retell the creation story.

·          To explore how Christians say thank you to God.

·          To reflect on what in the natural world we can be thankful for.

·          To describe a place which causes them awe and wonder.

·          To understand the significance of advent.

·          To understand traditions and symbols which signify advent (calendars)

·          To understand Mary and Joseph’s journey to Bethlehem

·          To explore the journey of the shepherds

·          To examine the visit of the Three Kings

·          To discuss traditions at Christmas

·          To make a Christingle and explore its symbolism.

Art/DT

 

Comparing food from the past and present

·           explore and evaluate a range of existing products

·          understand the similarities and differences between Tudor food and modern day food

Design and make a castle

·          build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable

·          evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria

·          select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing]

·           design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria

 

 

 

Music Medieval Music

 

·          Listen to simple elements of music.

·          Verbally recall what they have heard with simple vocabulary. I.e loud, soft, high low etc.

·          Identify a strong, steady pulse in music.

·          Identify simple repeated rhythmic patterns.

 

Christmas songs

 

·          Confidently use their own voices in many different ways.

·          Know how to use high, low and middle voice.

·          Sing songs with more accurate pitch.

Personal, Social and Emotional Development SEAL Health and Wellbeing

·         To be aware of the process of growing from young to old and how people’s needs change.

·         To know the names for the main parts of the body (including external genitalia) and similarities and differences between boys and girls.

·         To know the rules for and ways of keeping physically safe (including safety online, the responsible use of ICT, the differences between secrets and surprises and understanding not to keep adults’ secrets; road safety, cycle safety and safety in the environment) (SEAL)

·         To know who to go to if they are worried and how to attract their attention. (SEAL)

·         To recognise that they share a responsibility for keeping themselves and others safe, when to say “yes”, “no”, “I’ll ask” and “I’ll tell”.

·         To recognise that there are different types of bullying, that these are wrong and unacceptable. (SEAL)

·         To know how to resist teasing or bullying, if they experience or witness it, whom to go to and how to get help. (SEAL)

French Greetings

 

·         listen to and repeat French vocabulary for greetings and feelings

·          Match pictures to the French vocabulary

 

 

Download Year 1 Curriculum

YEAR 2 - AUTUMN TERM 2018

Subject Autumn 1 Autumn 2
Core text/Theme London – The Big Smoke The Robot and the Bluebird
English Recount – diary from someone who was there

Newspaper reports- The fire and rebuilding

Information texts – tourist guide to London

Shape poetry

Narrative – fantasy story retelling and creating characters

Supporting texts

The Diary of Samuel Pepys

Vlad and the Great Fire of London

You wouldn’t want to be in the Great Fire of London

Katie in London

Instructions – how to make a robot

Persuasive writing -giving reasons why the robot should continue on his journey

Letters

Narrative – Retelling the story and writing an alternative ending

Supporting texts

The Owl Who Was Afraid of the Dark (GR)

Maths Number –place value
  • Count in steps of 2, 3 and 5 from 0 and in tens from any number, forward and backward.
  • Recognise the place value of each digit in a two digit number (tens, ones)
  • Identify, represent and estimate numbers to 100 using different representations including the number line.

 

Number –addition and subtraction

  • Recall and use addition and subtraction facts to 20 fluently, and derive and use related facts up to 100.
  • Add and subtract numbers using concrete objects, pictorial representations, and mentally, including: a two digit number and ones; a two digit number and tens; two two digit numbers; adding three one digit numbers.

 

Measurement: Money

  • Recognise and use symbols of pounds (£) and pence (p); combine amounts to make a particular value

 

Multiplication and Division

  • Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 times tables, including recognising odd and even numbers.
  • Calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division within the multiplication tables and write them using the multiplication (x), division (÷) and equals (=) sign.
Science Animals including humans
  • Notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults
  • Find out about and describe the basic needs of animals, including humans, for survival (water, food and air)
  • Describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene
Everyday materials
  • Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses
  • Experiment with different materials to find out how the shapes of some solid objects can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching

 

Computing Digital literacy
  • Recognise how to use technology respectfully.
  • Complete ROAR/MeOnline online E-safety activities.
  • Discuss and understand the school’s e-Safety SMART rules
  • Explore what cyber bulling means and how to deal with it
Computer Science
  • Know that household objects need to be programmed
  • Create a sequence of instructions to control a programmable robot to carry out a pre-determined route to include direction, distance and turn (on screen or floor robot)
PE Games -partner and small group work focussing on throwing and catching skills

Dance- creating a fire dance using fast and slow movements

Games – playing known games and developing awareness of space and simple tactics.

-Making up a game

Gymnastics – balances and apparatus work focussing on high and how movements

History How has London changed?
  • Show an understanding of the main elements of GFL.
  • Create written recounts of stories from that time.
  • Create a timeline of some significant events in London from GFL onwards.
  • Think about how life was different at the time of GFL and use evidence to explain why (transport, food, clothes, hygiene).
  • Begin to use historical knowledge to make connections between local and regional history – understand similarities and differences between the Fire of Newcastle and Gateshead, build of bridges, introduction of means public transport
  • Begin to look at The Gunpowder Plot and the reasons Guy Fawkes acted as he did, beginning to explore more than one view point.
Geography How do people travel in London?
  • Create maps and plans including simple keys for a variety of purposes – London bus routes
  • Identify features on a map – capital city, landmarks in London
What does a map tell us?
  • Hypothesise about, and prove changes in weather and seasons using a range of evidence.
  • Describe hot and cold areas of the world with reference to the equator, North and South Poles.
  • Identify features on a map.
  • Create maps and plans including simple keys and grid references for a variety of purposes (Journeys and local map making).
  • Name, locate and label the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom
  • Know physical and human features of different areas
RE Christianity
  • To explore the qualities of a good parent.
  • To understand that God is a loving father – what God thinks of us.
  • To understand how precious we are to God  – The Lost Sheep
  • To explore how loving others shows love for God
  • To understand God as life giver – made in his image
  • To understand that God provides for his people – Harvest
  • To explore how Christians follow God’s example to help those in need – Tearfund
Judaism
  • To understand the story of Hanukkah
  • To draw comparisons between Hanukkah and Christmas.
  • To evaluate kosher foods.
  • To compare and contrast Hanukkah and Diwali

Christianity

  • To understand that Jesus is known as light of the world.
  • To understand that Jesus birth was special from the outset.
  • To understand the events surrounding Jesus birth.
  • To understand the significance of Jesus special visitors.
Art/DT Comparing food from the past and present
  • Understand and use the terms ingredient and component.
  • Use simple scales or balances to weigh out ingredients to make a cake using a recipe from the past.
  • Understand main rules of food hygiene and use these when cooking.
Design and make a robot that can move
  • Talk about how moving objects work.
  • Use wheels, slide and levers when designing and planning a moving robot.
  • Follow basic safety rules when gaining experience using natural and manmade materials.
  • Use their knowledge of some working characteristics of materials to design a robot, adding labels to their design.
  • Measure and cut fabric
Music Music from the past and present
  • Listen to and enjoy simple elements of music.
  • Verbally recall what they have heard with simple vocabulary. I.e loud, soft, high low etc.
  • Identify a strong, steady pulse in music.
  • Identify simple repeated rhythmic patterns.
Christmas songs
  • Confidently use their own voices in many different ways.
  • Know how to use high, low and middle voice.
  • Sing songs with more accurate pitch.
Personal, Social and Emotional Development SEAL Health and Wellbeing
    • To be aware of the process of growing from young to old and how people’s needs change.
    • To know the names for the main parts of the body (including external genitalia) and similarities and differences between boys and girls.
    • To know the rules for and ways of keeping physically safe (including safety online, the responsible use of ICT, the differences between secrets and surprises and understanding not to keep adults’ secrets; road safety, cycle safety and safety in the environment)
    • To know who to go to if they are worried and how to attract their attention.
    • To recognise that they share a responsibility for keeping themselves and others safe, when to say “yes”, “no”, “I’ll ask” and “I’ll tell”.
    • To recognise that there are different types of bullying, that these are wrong and unacceptable.
  • To know how to resist teasing or bullying, if they experience or witness it, whom to go to and how to get help.
French Numbers 1 – 20

Healthy Eating

  • listen to and repeat French vocabulary for fruits and vegetables
    • Match pictures to the French vocabulary
  • Repeat numbers rhymes

Download Year 2 Curriculum

YEAR 3 - AUTUMN TERM 2018

Subject Autumn 1 Autumn 2
Core text/Theme BLAST FROM THE PAST HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON

-Cressida Cowell

 

English

 

 

 

Non-chronological report – life in an Anglo-Saxon settlement

–       Use simple organisational devices (e.g. headings and subheadings)

–       Use the present tense

–       Use subject specific vocabulary

–       Use the third person

 

 

Narrative – Create story based on a stone-age character

–       Using ‘show not tell’ for description

–       Use a range of adjectives and similes in writing

–       Creates settings, characters and plot, with some attempt to elaborate on basic information or events

 

Newspaper report – Vikings invading Anglo-Saxon settlements

–       Understanding that reports are usually written in the past tense but can change to the present tense.

–       Understanding how to include direct speech using the correct punctuation

–       Creates settings, characters and plot, with some attempt to elaborate on basic information or events

–       Understand and use a ‘formal tone’

 

 

Supporting texts

 

Ug – Raymond Briggs

Pebble in my Pocket – Meredith Cooper/Chris Coady

 

 

Narrative – Character and mythical pet adventure

–       Develop an increasing range of sentence structures and use a range of sentence openers.

–       Begin to use paragraphs by organising ideas with related points placed next to each other.

 

 

Poetry – Focus on personification of animals/creatures

–       Composes and rehearses sentences orally

–       Understand the meaning of personification and metaphors

–       Investigate and use rhyming pairs

–       Assesses the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggests improvements

 

Instructions – How to train your dragon

–       Discuss writing similar to that which they are planning to write and understands and learns from its structure, vocabulary and grammar

–       Use imperatives

 

 

Supporting text

 

The Iron Man – Ted Hughes

Maths  

Number/ place value

 

Identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations.

 

Find 10 or 100 more or less than a given number; recognise the place value of each digit in a three digit number (hundreds, tens, ones).

 

Compare and order numbers up to 1000

 

Read and write numbers up to 1000 in numerals and in words.

 

Solve number problems and practical problems involving these ideas.

 

Count from 0 in multiples of 50 and 100

 

Number addition and subtraction

 

Add and subtract numbers mentally; including: a three digit number and ones; a three digit number and tens; a three digit number and hundreds

 

Add and subtract numbers with up to three digits, using formal written methods of columnar addition and subtraction

 

Estimate the answer to a calculation and use inverse operations to check answers.

 

 

 

Number addition and subtraction

 

Solve problems, including missing number problems, using number facts, place value, and more complex addition and subtraction

 

Add and subtract amounts of money to give change, using both £ and p in practical contexts

 

 

 

 

Number- multiplication and division

 

 

Recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 3, 4 and 8 multiplication tables.

 

Calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division within the 3,4,8 x tables and write them correctly

 

Solve problems involving multiplication and division using material, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods and multiplication and division facts including problems in contexts

 

Show that multiplication of 2 numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and division of one number by another cannot.

 

 

 

Science

 

Rocks and soils

 

Describe in simple terms how fossils are formed when things that have lived are trapped within the rock

 

Recognise that soils are made from rocks and organic matter.

Compare and group together different types of rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical properties.

Animals including humans

 

 

Identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat.

 

Identify that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement.

 

Identify and compare the different skeletal systems of animals and humans

 

Computing Digital literacy

 

Understand how Google Classroom and School

 

360 is a safe environment to work and be social with classmates online

 

Understand that not all information online is trustworthy e.g. SMARTcrew video by Childnet

Know and understand the five SMART rules (Safe, Meetings, Accepting, Reliable, Tell)

 

 

 

Computer Science (programming)

 

Explain what computer programming is and how algorithms work

 

Control an object to move along a route

 

Follow a code sequence e.g. using Scratch cards

 

PE  

Dance

 

Move across the room indifferent ways with an awareness of space.

 

Make increasingly clear and fluid movements.

 

Understand the different uses of tense, relax, stretch, curl in movement.

 

Improvise with ideas and movements.

 

Copy, remember, repeat, and explore simple actions and movements with control and coordination.

 

Begin to sequence moves and link actions.

 

Begin to choose movement to show ideas.

 

Games (Invasion)

 

 

Travel successfully to and from objects and locations on the ground

 

Choose simple approaches to problem solving and work cooperatively with others on tasks

 

Show an awareness of how to keep safe

 

Move a ball with control and accuracy

 

Show increasing confidence when rolling, hitting or kicking a ball.

 

Understand the importance of rules and fairness

 

Follow rules in games

 

Understand the concept of both team and opponent.

 

Develop and use simple tactics in team games.

 

 

 

Gymnastics

 

Create a routine resembling a battle from the stone age or viking invasion

 

Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance (for example, through athletics and gymnastics)

 

Move across the room indifferent ways with an awareness of space.

 

Make increasingly clear and fluid movements.

 

Understand the different uses of tense, relax, stretch, curl in movement.

 

Improvise with ideas and movements.

 

Copy, remember, repeat, and explore simple actions and movements with control and coordination.

 

Begin to sequence moves and link actions.

 

Begin to choose movement to show ideas.

 

Games (Net and Wall)

 

Understand how to strike a ball with an implement e.g tennis racket

 

Choose simple approaches to problem solving and work cooperatively with others on tasks

 

Show an awareness of how to keep safe

 

 

Understand the importance of rules and fairness

 

Follow rules in games

 

Understand the concept of both team and opponent.

 

Develop and use simple tactics in team games.

 

 

 

 

 

 

History

 

How has Britain changed since the stone age?

 

Understand that some events from the past affect people’s lives today. (Look how Britain has changed over time, from the stone age until now).

 

Summarise the main events from a period in history, using their characteristics.

(Study the main purposes/jobs of specific groups of people from specific periods of time).

 

Sort events or objects into groups e.g Anglo-Saxon tools and weapons

 

Use dates and terms accurately, using key dates when describing events.

 

Understand the concept of decades and centuries and use this to divide the past into periods of time.

 

Use evidence to describe changes within the Anglo-Saxon and Viking period, comparing to modern day. Understand the origins of Anglo Saxon kingdoms and place names within Britain.

 

 

 

Geography  

Use atlases to accurately locate and retrieve information about European countries

 

Use contents and index pages of an atlas accurately

 

Begin to name and locate the countries of Europe and locate on a map. Link to origins of Vikings and Anglo Saxons (Denmark, Netherlands, Germany, Sweden, Norway)

 

 

 

 

 

Understand that different places may have a similar/different characteristics and give reasons for these

 

Describe and identify how a place has changed

 

Identify the parts of a river, and land use around and how these can change peoples’ lives

RE Ask important questions about religion and beliefs, making links between his/her own and others’ responses.

 

Explore similarities and differences in how religion is expressed in different world religions.

 

 

Identify the impact of religion on believers’ everyday lives.

 

Make links between values and commitments, and his/her own attitudes and behaviour.

 

Respond to questions that cause wonder, staying respectful to others’ beliefs and ideas.

Art/DT

 

Cooking on the fire

Recognise how eating different food groups create a varied diet.

 

Follow a recipe, weighing out ingredients appropriately.

Design and follow a recipe in the style of an Anglo Saxon

 

Create Stone Age cave paintings

Develop a range of art and design techniques using a range of materials.

Painting

-Mix colours effectively.

-Use a number of brush

techniques using thick

and thin brushes to

produce shapes, textures,

patterns and lines.

 

Drawing

– Use different hardnesses

of pencils to show line,

tone.

 

-Use shading to show light and shadow and texture.

 

Make a settlement

 

Use clay and straw to create Early Briton houses and settlements.

 

Measure and cut out in precise detail and make sure that finished products are carefully finished – include different materials for fencing, housing, farmland.

 

Make separate elements of a model before combining into the finished article

 

Sculpture

– Use clay and other

mouldable materials.

 

– Add materials to provide

interesting detail.

 

 

 

Music  

Year 3 will have a specialist teaching music provision throughout the year focussing on singing and playing the violin.

 

.Play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices and play musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression

Improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the interrelated dimensions of music

Listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory

Use and understand staff and other musical notations

 

 

Personal, Social and Emotional Development SEAL Health and Wellbeing

●      Children to know what positively and negatively affects their physical, mental and emotional health (including the media).

●      How to make informed choices (including recognising that choices can have positive, neutral and negative consequences) and to begin to understand the concept of a ‘balanced lifestyle’. (SEAL)

●      To recognise opportunities to make their own choices about food, what might influence their choices and the benefits of eating a balanced diet.

●      To recognise how images in the media do not always reflect reality and can affect how people feel about themselves.

●      To realise the consequences of anti-social and aggressive behaviours such as bullying. (Living in the wider world).

 

 

 

French  

 

 

All About Me

 

●      Use sounds to help to read written words.

●      Name and label articles. (label the parts of body)

●      Read aloud a familiar sentence.

●      Acquire simple vocabulary for some verbs, not always in tense.

●      Label key vocabulary within text.

 

 

 

 

 

Download Year 3 Curriculum

YEAR 4 - AUTUMN TERM 2018

Subject Autumn 1 Autumn 2
Core text/Theme The Empire Strikes Back Charlotte’s Web
 

Literacy

 

 

Ancient Greek myths – Narrative

Increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including fairy stories, myths and legends, and retelling some of these orally
Discussing words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination
Preparing poems and play scripts to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action
In narratives, creating settings, characters and plot
Extending the range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider range of conjunctions, including: when, if, because, although

Rotten Romans – Reports

Retrieve and record information from non-fiction
Using dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read
Discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar
Organising paragraphs around a theme
In non-narrative material, using simple organisational devices [for example, headings and sub-headings]

Charlotte’s Web – Narrative

Identifying themes and conventions in a wide range of books

Drawing inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence
Using fronted adverbials
Using and punctuating direct speech
Read their own writing aloud to a group or the whole class, using  appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear

Charlotte’s web – debates and letter writing
Choosing nouns or pronouns appropriately for clarity and cohesion and to avoid repetition
Identifying how language, structure, and presentation contribute to meaning
Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements

 

Numeracy Number – Place Value

Count in multiples of 6,7,9,25 and 1000

Find 1000 more or less of a given number

Count backwards through 0 to include negative numbers

Recognise the place value of each digit of a four digit number (1000. 100. 10, 1)

Order and compare numbers beyond 1000

Identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations

 Round any number to the nearest 10, 100 or 1000

Solve number and practical problems that involve all of the above and with increasingly large positive numbers

Read Roman numerals 100 (I – C) and know that over time the numeral system changed to include the concept of 0 and place value

 

 

Number – Addition and Subtraction

Add and subtract numbers with up to 4 digits using the formal written methods of column addition and subtraction where appropriate

Estimate and use inverse operations to check answers to a calculation

Solve addition and subtraction 2 step problems in contexts deciding which operations and methods to use and why

Number – Multiplication and Division

Recall and use multiplication and division facts for multiplication tables up to 12 x 12

Use place value, known and derived facts to multiply and divide mentally, including: multiplying by 0 and 1, dividing by 1, multiplying together three numbers

Recognise and use factor pairs and commutatively in mental calculations

Multiply 2 digit and 3 digit numbers by a 1 digit number using formal written layout

Solve problem involving multiplying and adding, including using the distributive law to multiply two numbers by 1 digit, integer scaling problems and harder correspondence problems such as N objects are connected to M objects

 

 

Measurement – Area

Find the area of rectilinear shapes by counting squares

Science

 

Electricity

Identify common appliances that run on electricity

Construct a simple series electrical circuit, identifying and naming its basic parts, including cells, wires, bulbs, switches and buzzers

Identify whether or not a lamp will light in a simple series circuit, based on whether or not the lamp is part of a complete loop with a battery

Recognise that a switch opens and closes a circuit and associate this with whether or not a lamp lights in a simple series circuit

Recognise some common conductors and insulators, and associate metals with being good conductors.

 

 

Animals including Humans

Describe the simple functions of the basic parts of the digestive system in humans

Identify the different types of teeth in humans and their simple functions

Construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey.

Computing Digital Literacy

Understand what is cyberbullying

 

Understand how to keep themselves safe online and how to report concerns

Computer Science

Write instructions for a sprite to follow in Scratch

 

Use conditional statements (if … then) within an animation

 

Use repeat events in programs

 

Make improvements to make an animation more exciting

PE Swimming

Swim competently, confidently and proficiently over a distance of at least 25m

 

Games (Greek Olympics)

Play competitive games, modified where appropriate

and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending

 

Throwing/Catching

Use running, jumping, throwing and catching in isolation and in combination

 

Gymnastics

Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance

 

History

 

How did the Roman Empire affect the world?

Distinguish between reliable and unreliable sources

 

Understand that some evidence is limited

 

Describe how some things from the past affect life today

 

Use a full range of date and historical terms

 

Use a timeline to place events, periods and cultural movements

 

Show changes on a timeline. Describe and make links between events and changes

 

Understand links between History and Geography

How has land use changed?

Know some similarities and differences within a period of time for examples the lives of rich and poor

 

Ask pertinent questions to explore possible answers

 

Choose from and use a range of documents and printed sources

 

Give reasons for change through analysing evidence

 

Geography Ancient vs Modern Greece

Draw maps of local places, including sketches from field work

 

Describe key aspects of: human geography including settlements and land use

 

Name and locate the countries of Europe and identify their main physical and human characteristics

Farmland in the UK and around the globe

Understand the different uses of different places

 

Understand and use the concept of links between physical and human features

 

RE Christianity

§   To understand the term, Holy Spirit

§   To understand that the Holy Spirit is living and active in people’s lives – The story of Nicodemus

§   To explore how the Holy Spirit came at Pentecost

§   To examine the reformation and how the Holy Spirit opened the eyes of Martin Luther

§   To examine a modern day example of someone who has experienced the transformation of the Holy Spirit in their lives.

§   To compare and contrast the lives of two people, one with and one without the Holy Spirit.

Hinduism

§   To understand why festivals are celebrated.

§   To introduce the idea of the Diwali festival.

§   To explore a typical Diwali for a Hindu

§   To explore the Sanskrit alphabet

§   To explore the Madir (Hindu temple)

 

Christianity

§   To understand aspects of the festival of Christmas.

§   To understand who the Magi were and their significance.

§   To compare and contrast King Herold with King Jesus.

§   To explore the consequences of Herold’s jealousy – Mary and Joseph’s flit to Egypt

§   To understand that Jesus was a gift to the world.

§   To understand the circumstances of Jesus birth and its significance.

Art/DT

 

Ancient Greek Art

 

Begin to develop an understanding of the range of art, craft and design techniques used by artists/designers

 

Art – Great artists, architects and designers in history

Continue to develop an understanding of the work of either artists, architects or designers in history

 

Replicate some of the techniques used by notable artists, artisans and designers

 

DT – Design, Make & Evaluate

Use others to help generate ideas

 

Use what they know about the properties of materials

 

Plan work to include a range of joins

 

Ensure that plans are realistic and appropriate for the aim

 

Show the order of working in plans

 

Use models, pictures and words in designs

 

Use scoring and folding for precision

 

Work out how to make models stronger

 

Use what they know about the properties of materials

 

Alter and adapt materials to make them stronger

 

Be clear about ideas when asked

 

Can alter and adapt original plans following discussion and evaluation

 

 

 

 

Farm Animals

 

Art – Develop techniques with creativity

 

Develop ideas from starting points throughout the curriculum

 

Adapt and refine ideas as they progress

 

Explore ideas in a variety of ways

 

DT – Nutrition

Understand seasonality, and know when and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed

 

Understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet

 

Understand safe food storage

 

Music The music of war

Lead a group when performing.

 

Compose simple tunes using a pentatonic scale.

Use repeated patterns for effect.

Follow instructions from symbols when singing or playing.

Know and use simple standard notation of pitch and beat.

Give reasons for opinions about music from the past.

 

Sing with me

Sing in tune and with expression. –

Hold their own part when performing by ear or by notation.

Begin to sing in two part harmony. –

Show control through breathing, articulation and dynamic.

Take part in two-part harmonies.

Understand the relationship between lyrics and melody.

Note key features of the work of a given composer.

Personal, Social and Emotional Development SEAL Relationships

To judge what kind of physical contact is acceptable or unacceptable and how to respond.

 

To understand the concept of ‘keeping something confidential or secret’, when we should or should not agree to do this and when it is right to ‘break a confidence’ or ‘share a secret’.

 

To work collaboratively towards shared goals. (SEAL)

 

To develop strategies to resolve disputes and conflict through negotiation and appropriate compromise and to give rich and constructive feedback and support to benefit others as well as themselves. (SEAL)

French Les quatre amis (The four friends)

 

Listen beyond a level at which they can speak independently.

 

Tell the time in simple terms.

 

Articulate clearly.

 

Fill in a table of verbs.

Underline correct/ incorrect.

 

Identify simple errors.

Memorise and recall key words to use in writing.

 

Sequence sentences to form short narratives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Download Year 4 Curriculum

YEAR 5 - AUTUMN TERM 2018

Subject Autumn 1  

Autumn 2

Core text/Theme Marvellous Monarchs

Twelfth Night- William Shakespeare

Street Child- Berlie Doherty

Marvellous Monarchs

A Christmas Carol

 

English

 

 

Hamlet William Shakespeare- Play script

-Perform drama compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so that meaning is clear.

-Study Shakespearean vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning.

-Use further organisational and presentational devices to structure play scripts.

-Identify the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate

Letter writing project

-Recognition of features and letter layout

-Composition of developed statements to build upon discussion

-Consideration of historical content.

 

Street Child- Berlie Doherty- Narrative

-To write narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings.

-Integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action.

-Use expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely.

-Use extensive range of punctuation to clarify meaning.

-To create non-fiction reports based upon historical research.

A Christmas Carol- Charles Dickens- Narrative

-Increase their familiarity with a wide range of books, including fiction from our literary heritage.

-Draw inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justify inferences with evidence.

-Discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader.

-Use a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs

 

Poetry through Christmas Carols

-Note and develop initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary.

-Recognise poetry patterns including rhyme and rhythm.

-Assess the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing.

 

Christmas around the world- Non-fiction-

-Recognise vocabulary and structures that are appropriate for formal speech and writing.

-Use further organisational and presentational devices to structure text and to guide the reader

 

 

Maths Place value and number

 

Read, write, order and compare numbers to 1,000,000, and count in powers of 10 from any given number.

 

Interpret negative numbers in context.

.

Round any given number to the nearest 10, 100, 1000, 10,000 and 100,000.

 

Read Roman Numerals to 1000 and recognise years written in Roman Numerals.

 

Addition and subtraction

 

Add and subtract numbers with more than 4 digits, using mental methods and formal written methods of column addition and subtraction.

 

Use rounding to check answers.

Statistics

 

Interpret and solve problems using line graphs.

 

Complete, read and interpret timetables.

Multiplication and division

 

Use known facts to multiply and divide mentally, including by 10, 100 and 1000.

 

Identify factors, multiples, squares and cubes.

 

Understand the vocabulary of prime numbers, prime factors and composite numbers, and recall prime numbers up to 19.

 

 

Perimeter and area

 

Measure and calculate perimeter of composite rectilinear shapes (made from rectangles) in cm and mm.

 

Calculate and compare the area of rectangles and estimate area of irregular shapes.

Problem solving

 

Throughout all topics

 

Solve problems in context and practical problems using all skills learned, choosing most suitable methods and operations.

 

Explain and reason about mathematical choices and discoveries both verbally and in writing.

 

Science

 

Animals including humans

 

-Describe the changes as humans develop to old age.

-Describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibian, an insect and a bird.

-Describe the life process of reproduction in some plants and animals

 

Properties and changes of materials

-Compare everyday materials on the basis of their properties.

-Explore separation of solids, liquids and gases.

-Reason about everyday use of materials due to their properties

-Demonstrate that dissolving, mixing and changes of state are reversible changes

Computing Information technology

 

-Use search technologies effectively and be discerning in evaluating digital content

-Select, use and combine a variety of software to create multimedia presentations regarding monarchy.

Digital Literacy

-Use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly

-To recognise acceptable/unacceptable online behaviour.

-Identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.

 

PE Cross country

-To develop running techniques for endurance and efficiency.

 

Gymnastics

-Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance

 

 

Invasion Games -Football and Hockey

-Play competitive games and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending.

 

Dance

-Perform dances using a range of movement patterns

 

History

 

A Victorian Study

-Use timelines to organise a series of relevant historical information about British monarchs and check this for accuracy.

-Develop own opinions about the time periods studied, and justify these with evidence, adapting their ideas and viewpoints as new information arises.

-Describe the main political and cultural changes in the Victorian period.

 

Geography Human Geography

Compare customs and celebrations with UK and other countries.

-Draw comparisons of Christmas celebrations across the world

RE Christianity

-Understand the Christian view of God, including the Holy Trinity

-Know the importance of the Bible to Christian

-Develop an understanding of belonging to a religious community.

-Recognise the ways that Christians demonstrate their faith through clothing, actions and worship.

Christianity

-Compare and contrast Christian beliefs with their own and people that they know

– Learn about the Christian attitude to personal and social matters

– Identify qualities that Christians value as important

– Know the importance of festivals including Harvest and Epiphany

– Discover rites of passage in different Christian denominations

 

Art/DT

 

 

Victorian Art

-Accurately use a range of materials to create a Victorian pop-up book.

-Further develop an understanding of the range of art, craft and design techniques used by William Morris or JMW Turner.

 

Food Technology

-Use the qualities of materials to enhance ideas.

-Evaluate Christmas regional delicacies by taste, texture, flavour.

Music

 

 

Digital music composition

 

-Recognise how different musical elements are combined expressively in many different types of music, culminating in a garage band composition using computer technology.

-Combine several layers of sound with awareness of combined effect.

 

Christmas Carols for performance of ‘A Christmas Carol’.

 

-Follow written instructions, including notation when singing or playing.

-Use imagination and confidence when composing

-Use changes in timbre, pitch and dynamic.

-Understand the use of silence in composition.

Personal, Social and Emotional Development SEAL -To recognise changes in humans from birth to old age.

– To recognise what constitutes a healthy relationship.

-To understand healthy body images

-To promote self-esteem and confidence.

Relationship and Sex Education-Provision through specialist health professionals within the year (Dates to be confirmed)

French Specialist teaching provision-

Begin to understand and use simple grammatical features – e.g. tense.

– Memorise key words and phrases from books, building vocabulary.

– Use language in drama and role play, and experiment with new vocabulary.

– Speak audibly with increasing fluency.

– Use increasingly correct vocabulary and terminology.

– Ask questions to extend understanding.

– Explain ideas and concepts, showing understanding and comprehension.

Download Year 5 Curriculum

YEAR 6 - AUTUMN TERM 2018

Year 6 Curriculum Map 2018 – 2019

Subject Autumn 1 Autumn 2

 

Core text/Theme World War 2

Hamlet/Friend or Foe (Michael Morpurgo)

 

English

 

 

To study a range of texts including:

Hamlet

Friend or Foe (Michael Morpurgo)

Poetry texts based on seasons.

 

Reading

– to continue to read and discuss an increasingly wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks

– to read books that are structured in different ways and read for a range of purposes

– to increase their familiarity with a wide range of books, including myths, legends and traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage, and books from other cultures and traditions

– to discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader

– to participate in discussions about books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, building on their own and others’ ideas and challenging views courteously

– to provide reasoned justifications for their views.

-learning a wider range of poetry by heart

– preparing poems and plays to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone and volume so that the meaning is clear to an audience

 

Writing

-to write narratives, identifying audience and selecting the appropriate form

– integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action.

-consider underlying themes within a text and imitate this authorial style in own writing.

– write balanced arguments, considering evidence for both sides.

-Use expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely.

-Use extensive range of punctuation:

●         semi colons, colons and dashes to mark clause boundaries between independent clauses

●         hyphens to avoid ambiguity

●         brackets, dashes and commas for parenthesis

– to edit writing by proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation; and by choosing the appropriate register

-perform their own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so that meaning is clear.

 

 

 

Hamlet

 

To study the language of William Shakespeare and understand the story of Hamlet.

To make deductions from a text.

To recognise rhyme and rhythm.

 

Friend or Foe by Michael Morpurgo

 

To write character diaries showing perspective and emotional language

To use an informal letter writing style featuring varied punctuation.

To write next part of text using slow writing.

To write interview questions on the topic of evacuation, conduct interviews and record them in an appropriate style for a magazine.

To write a narrative called “The Secret”

To read examples of biographies and identify features.

To write a biography.

To write to explain a “how to” guide.

To write a review of “Friend or Foe”

 

 

Non-fiction:

Reading:

– explain and discuss their understanding of what they have read, including through formal presentations and debates, maintaining a focus on the topic and using notes where necessary

– provide reasoned justifications for their views.

 

Writing:

– noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary

– using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs

– Use extensive range of punctuation:

●         using further organisational and presentational devices to structure text and to guide the reader [for example, headings, bullet points, underlining]

●         using a colon to introduce a list

●         punctuating bullet points consistently

 

Poetry Unit -Seasons

The Wind by James Reeves – to understand poetic features and analyse poem use correct terminology.

Dear Autumn poem

To create personified character of Autumn and writing poetic reply to Winter

Leisure – William Henry Davies

A Visit from St Nicholas – Clement Moore and Hawaiian version – To write a comparison essay of both poems.

To create own celebration poem

Drama Unit

Christmas Day Truce/ study of Sainbury’s advert and “Pipes of Peace” music video.

 

Maths Place value and number

read, write, order and compare numbers up to 10 000 000 and determine the value of each digit

round any whole number to a required degree of accuracy

use negative numbers in context, and calculate intervals across zero

solve number and practical problems that involve all of the above.

 

Four operations

 

multiply multi-digit numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit whole number using the formal written method of long multiplication

 

divide numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit whole number using the formal written method of long division, and interpret remainders as whole number remainders, fractions, or by rounding, as appropriate for the context

 

divide numbers up to 4 digits by a two-digit number using the formal written method of short division where appropriate, interpreting remainders according to the context

 

perform mental calculations, including with mixed operations and large numbers

 

identify common factors, common multiples and prime numbers

 

use their knowledge of the order of operations to carry out calculations involving the four operations

 

solve addition and subtraction multi-step problems in contexts, deciding which operations and methods to use and why

 

solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and division

 

use estimation to check answers to calculations and determine, in the context of a problem, an appropriate degree of accuracy.

 

Fractions

 

use common factors to simplify fractions; use common multiples to express fractions in the same denomination

 

compare and order fractions, including fractions > 1

 

add and subtract fractions with different denominators and mixed numbers, using the concept of equivalent fractions

 

multiply simple pairs of proper fractions, writing the answer in its simplest form

 

divide proper fractions by whole numbers

 

associate a fraction with division and calculate decimal fraction equivalents [for example, 0.375] for a simple fraction

 

identify the value of each digit in numbers given to three decimal places and multiply and divide numbers by 10, 100 and 1000 giving answers up to three decimal places

 

Position and direction

 

describe positions on the full coordinate grid (all four quadrants)

 

draw and translate simple shapes on the coordinate plane, and reflect them in the axes.

 

Science

 

Light (Physics)

 

 

–  recognise that light appears to travel in straight lines

 

–  use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain that objects are seen because they give out or reflect light into the eye

 

–  explain that we see things because light travels from light sources to our eyes or from light sources to objects and then to our eyes

 

–  use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them.

 

Electricity (Physics)

 

–       associate the brightness of a lamp or the volume of a buzzer with the number and voltage of cells used in the circuit

 

–       compare and give reasons for variations in how components function, including the brightness of bulbs, the loudness of buzzers and the on/off position of switches

 

–       use recognised symbols when representing a simple circuit in a diagram.

 

 

Computing

Computer Science


Using Scratch online
design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems;

use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs

solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts

work with variables and various forms of input and output

use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs

Digital media

–  understand ways to create digital music

–  find ways of editing and altering digital music

–  understand the role of a sample and how repeition in programming can develop this

 

PE Hockey

Children will continue to receive teaching of P.E by partnership specialists.

-To combine invasion in team games.

Gymnastics

Children will continue to receive teaching of P.E by partnership specialists.

They will focus on advancing their gymnastics skills and running stamina

 

History

 

 

To organise key 20th Century events in chronological order

To identify the key figures of World War 2 and write biogrpahical factfiles about them

To know about the major events of World War 2, including: The Blitz, the Holocaust,

D Day, and their significance in the outcome of the war

To consider political and personal priorities in wartime.

To find out and imagine

the experiences of The War at home including:

Evacuation

Make do and Mend

Dig for Victory

Bomb shelters, air raids and blackouts

 

Geography To understand how borders can change in wartime

To create maps showing political spread of the Allies and Axis powers in Europe

To understand the effect of America and Japan’s contributions to the worldscape of WW2

To identify the human resources needed for war and how this affected the country financially and agriculturally

To recognise the consequences of war in the local area

RE Judaisim

-Understand the Jewish view of God

-Know the importance of the Torah to Jewish people

-Develop an understanding of belonging to a religious community.

-Recognise the ways that Jewish people demonstrate their faith through clothing, actions and worship.

 

 

Art/DT

 

 

Artwork themed around World War 2

 

–       creating mixed media skylines of London during the Blitz

–       using wax crayons to create relief images

–       design and make an evacuee’s suitcase

–       designing propaganda posters

–       Make do and Mend design project

Music

 

 

Public Service Broadcasting

 

To listen to and appraise popular music

To understand the process of sampling

To identify the mood of music

To explore electronic ways of creating music

To compose music on a theme

Personal, Social and Emotional Development SEAL Emotional intelligence

To contribute to discussions about how to improve school life

To build resilience and assertiveness

To recognise the difference between assertiveness and argumentativeness

To give and receive compliments constructively

To continue to develop emotional intelligence and recognise the feelings of others

British values

To know the fundamental British values of democracy, rule of law, individual liberty, respect and tolerance

French French teaching for Year 6 will begin in Spring term.

Download Year 6 Curriculum

STATEMENT ON BRITISH VALUES

Ponteland First  School is committed to serving its community and surrounding areas. It recognises the multi cultural, multi faith and ever-evolving  nature of the United Kingdom and therefore those it serves. It also understands the vital role it has in ensuring that groups or individuals within the school are not subjected to intimidation or radicalisation by those wishing to unduly, or illegally, influence them.

Our  school accepts and welcomes  admissions from all those entitled to an education under British law, including pupils of all faiths or none. It follows the policies outlined by its governing body regarding equal opportunities, which guarantee that there will be no discrimination against any individual or group, regardless of faith, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, political or financial status, or similar. It seeks to serve all.

The Government emphasises that schools are required to ensure that key ‘British Values’ are taught in all UK schools. The government set out its definition of British values in the ‘Prevent Strategy’ – values of:

• democracy

• the rule of law

• individual liberty

• mutual respect

• tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs

Should you feel that the school is not meeting this requirement, you should contact the school office and request to express your concerns to the Head Teacher. Likewise, if you feel that anyone working at the school is intentionally or otherwise undermining these values, you should report this to the Head Teacher.

Our  school does, through a wide range of activities, secure such standards and uses strategies within the National Curriculum and beyond to secure such outcomes for children. The list below outlines samples of when and where such British Values are shared. The list is not exhaustive, and represents only some of what we do.

Subject studies: Developing the skill base required to access/share information, make/express decisions and apply themselves to society and the world. These include the understanding and use of money, effective writing and reading skills, collaborative work, to discuss and research ideas and concepts, and gain a broad and balanced understanding of the society in which the children live. Aspects of study beyond core skills include historical and geographical context of the United Kingdom, incorporating local and national evolution, as well as international comparisons.

Whole school daily acts of collective worship/assembly: The sharing of stories, images, events, music and expectations that, with clarity and precision, promote the values expressed. Such proceedings vary in the methodology of delivery in order to secure interest and understanding and are designed to impact on children regardless of knowledge, experience or  maturity. As a ‘community school’, ‘collective worship’ is non-denominational and recognising and acknowledging that those attending may have a wide range of faiths, or none. It is however, in line with regulation and is “wholly or mainly of a broadly Christian character”.

Religious Education: Gaining a greater understanding of religious diversity and practices, which covers key religions represented in the UK. Planning for the subject is directed by the ‘Standing Advisory Council on Religious Education (SACRE)– Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education’.

Physical Education: Promotion of the concept of ‘fair play’, following and developing rules, inclusion, celebrating and rewarding success and working together as part of a team.

School Council: Promotion of democratic processes, fostering the concept and application of freedom of speech and group action to address needs and concerns. Key to this is the concept of holding others to account, including those in positions of authority and influence.

 

L Blain

October 2014